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Old 01-26-2011, 12:00 AM
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Building a natural lake

So i have already checked through all the past posts and havent really found what i am looking for. recently, a long term customer of mine approached me about installing a natural lake for him. something around 50' x 50' and x' deep. what i am looking for is specifics. he wants to stock it with fish to get some catch and release practice in. our frost line here is about 36". do i need to build multiple platforms, what is the ideal depth, filtration, fish to help with filtration? i really havent found any really in depth posts. are there any good books or literature that cover this topic? thanks for the help
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:27 PM
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i am meeting with the homeowner on friday, and i have a pretty good idea of what to present. however, i am still looking for any pointers or literature. already ordered the RISE method, just hasnt shown up to the office yet.
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:01 PM
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What you and the homeowner are considering is a good size pond. I would not think of it as a lake.

Will this be an earth-bottom or lined pond?

What type of fish will be stocked? This is probably the most important question as relates to the design of the pond (i.e. depth, littoral zone area, types of plantings, stocking levels, etc.) and water quality (pH, DO, etc.). You can "Google" the habitat requirements for the fish specie(s) and find a lot of info. Ex. Catfish, natural habitat; Bass, natural habitat

Filtration may or may not be an absolute requisite depending on design and fish specie(s). Aeration will most likely be indicated.

Will this pond be subject to run-off? If so, what kind?....organic debris such as leaf drop?.....any other form of water quality pollutant?......is it in full sun?

What will be the water source? If well water, has it been tested for toxins and/or metals? What may be safe for humans can be fatal for aquatic life.

I would think a max. depth of 10-12 feet would be sufficient.
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Old 01-27-2011, 12:19 AM
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thanks for the help. this will be a lined "pond". it will mostly be stocked with steelhead and trout. but i dont know enough about fish to know which ones get along and which ones dont. it will be full sun, and the h2o supply will be a well that is clean. there is no runoff and will have mostly conifers around it. aerators will definately be used. are there any good books on this? thanks
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Old 01-27-2011, 09:30 AM
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Filtration for that size of a "pond" is a not factor. Aeration is what you will need. Trout is a cold water fish that prefers water temps around 55 degrees with lots of oxygen. A 5' -10' deep pond is just to shallow for them to survive during the summer months. The deeper the better, however the over size of the pond is a little on the small size for game fish anyways. For me any pond with game fish should be an 1/2 acre at least, but people do what they want... lol. Contact your local state extension office they should be able to help with the info your lookn for. Good luck
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Old 01-27-2011, 11:33 AM
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thanks for the help, these are some of the factors i just dont know (fish, etc.). the backyard is approx. 10 acres, and it is a pretty consistent gentle slope. so i have plenty of room to extend it as i need to, and vary any depth. again, does anyone know of any good books on this topic?
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Old 01-27-2011, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turner_landscaping View Post
Filtration for that size of a "pond" is a not factor. Aeration is what you will need. Trout is a cold water fish that prefers water temps around 55 degrees with lots of oxygen. A 5' -10' deep pond is just to shallow for them to survive during the summer months. The deeper the better, however the over size of the pond is a little on the small size for game fish anyways. For me any pond with game fish should be an 1/2 acre at least, but people do what they want... lol. Contact your local state extension office they should be able to help with the info your lookn for. Good luck
I completely agree. In addition, for trout, some areas of shade are desirable

It is hard to advise you on any one particular book as it appears that you need to research several different things Do various searches on "Google Books" on different topics that you feel will apply in determining the proper 'plan of attack'. You will more than likely need to use several sources of reference on this project.
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Old 01-27-2011, 12:07 PM
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Have you ever built a pond for a customer before? If you have its the same basic idea just on a larger scale because you are using a liner. Now if you are digging a earthen pond then thats a whole another topic. What kind of books are you looking for? If you have built ponds before using liners then apply your knowlege but think in larger terms without a filtration system because you will be using aeration instead. You mention the RISE method thats a good start. Now if you have never built a pond then this is something that you better ask a professional in your area how to do or even sub out and work with them and learn cause this job is some serious $$$$$$$. The liner alone will run you 5k - 10k. One thing you dont wanna do is lose your client cause did a bad job and didnt seek help on how to do it.
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Old 01-27-2011, 05:08 PM
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we build ponds all the time, usually in the $40,000 and up range, like i said, i havent done a lake/pond before. completely different style. i know the pricing, thats not the question. i talked to one of my suppliers today and they made a good point, i should start at the source, the local fish hatchery. we have a rather large local setup with the fish and game dept. so i am gonna go ask them the realistic fish questions.
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Old 01-27-2011, 06:29 PM
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I hope you didn't take my question the wrong way. The basic princples of building your pond with liner is the same way you already do just bigger. Think of it as a jumbo koi pond instead of natural pond. You will need to create shelves at various depths and provide a habitat for game fish namely logs boulders pipes and plant life.. Around the edges you will need to create basically a wetland or marsh around the edges to soften it. I built a super edge pond that was roughly the same diameter, ours was 45 x 40 a few yrs back. It hardly had any stone around the edges. The entire edge line was plants and sod and it looks like its been there for ever now that plants have grown over the edges into the water. The water level is within an 1/8 of a inch of the top of the liner. The homeowner belonged to a bunch of national plant societys so the pond had to look natural for all the tour people.
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