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  #41  
Old 02-27-2011, 04:59 PM
PL&L PL&L is offline
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i'm 17 and i own a lawn care business, what i do is look as professional and act as pro as i can. i have commercial equipment (just bought a exmark sat ) but just show them that you are a professional and maybe try lowering prices a tad. good luck
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  #42  
Old 02-27-2011, 05:42 PM
rogerdodger rogerdodger is offline
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starting a business

Have you tried Sean Adams Program?
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  #43  
Old 02-27-2011, 09:37 PM
MXrider13 MXrider13 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PL&L View Post
i'm 17 and i own a lawn care business, what i do is look as professional and act as pro as i can. i have commercial equipment (just bought a exmark sat ) but just show them that you are a professional and maybe try lowering prices a tad. good luck
Thats what I tired already, didn't you read all of the posts...
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  #44  
Old 02-27-2011, 09:39 PM
MXrider13 MXrider13 is offline
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Originally Posted by rogerdodger View Post
Have you tried Sean Adams Program?
Never heard of it
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  #45  
Old 02-28-2011, 03:38 AM
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jonthepain jonthepain is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tri-City Outdoors View Post
People love to save $. Coupons and discounts are always good.
I'll second that. I get most of my clients from my website, so I put a coupon up on the website.

I also get a lot of neighbors. Those are the best, because they have already seen my work, and trust me cuz Mrs. Smith next door told her I'm ok.

I think I got one customer with door hangers. Put out probably a thousand (usually put one in every door on the street, after finishing up a job,) which is a whole lot of work for little to no return.

But by far and away the website has been the best for bringing in new clients.
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  #46  
Old 02-28-2011, 08:43 PM
TurnerLawn&Landscape TurnerLawn&Landscape is offline
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networking is the key to gaining new customers. Talk to your mom, sister, aunt, dad, friends mom, etc. and tell them to "spread the word" about your services. Try to get in contact with wealthy residents around your community, go to the offices of churches in your neighborhood and leave them your contact info. Word of Mouth is by far the best advertising when it comes to hiring contractors. Also make sure you make it a point to tell your current customers that you are actively searching for new customers. Dont get down if results arent great. I HAVE FOUND THAT IF I JUST KEEP WORKING AND GRINDING AND SWEATING AND CUSSING.....EVERYTHING WORKS OUT!
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  #47  
Old 03-03-2011, 02:22 AM
CutterCutter CutterCutter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MXrider13 View Post
The problem with Mowing not being my primary is currently all of the grass is dead were I live. We just have weeds growing.
I live in a 200K plus subdivision, so far though everyone around here is really Rude, and is not interested. I actually think I am going to have to drive to a cheaper area to get work. Ill try the sign Idea, it sounds good.

Number one, you're not going to make any "real" money until the grass starts growing. There just isn't any meaningful money in gardening/weeding. So if I were in your shoes I'd start thinking about what I'm going to be doing when the grass starts growing.

In my original reply I mentioned the roadside signs. They work pretty good. Depending on the communities that are within a reasonable driving distance you could put out between one and two hundred signs. That's a lot of signs. I personally have never got close to putting out that many. But if you want a bunch of new business quickly the more signs the better.

I also mentioned putting up a colorful business card on the bulletin boards in grocery stores. Not one card but say fifteen cards per board. Be sure the card can be identified as being a lawn service from a distance and go back once a week to replace the cards that have been taken by potential customers. My card has a guy pushing a lawnmower so there's no doubt about what the service is.

Also, if you have a truck or van be sure you have your phone number and your companies name on it. Be sure your company name readily tells anyone that reads it that you provide lawn care services. For example, "Bob's Lawn Care" is a lot better than "Bob's Design Services".

Another business getter is screen printed t-shirts. Buy a dozen, say in yellow or light green, have your business name and phone number printed on the back and wear it everywhere you go that would be appropriate. Don't use any kind of dark color because it will burn you alive as you work in the sun.

The key to getting customers is finding people who are interested in your services. If I knock on 100 doors or leave 100 door hangers there may be five people who may be interested. The other 95 do their own lawn, or are moving during the next 60 days, or there's some other problem. On the other hand if 5,000 people see three of my signs every day there's a good chance a number of them will be in the market for someone to mow their lawn. Or say you've got your business cards in six supermarkets. How many thousand people will walk by your business card ever day? Let the customers come to you and quit fighting the rejection.

Regarding the income of your customers, you are going to find sooner or later that people in nicer homes are able to compensate you better than people in less expensive homes. They just have more spendable income. Of course, I have some $25 yards in modest neighborhoods but they are in the minority. Most of my accounts are $40 or $50 with some higher. My biggest is $265 per service and takes 2 1/2 hours.

Lastly, if you're working alone you don't need that many customers anyway. When I started I thought I needed one hundred customers. For the last several years I've had about thirty and have grossed 1k a week between April 1st and November 1st.
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  #48  
Old 03-03-2011, 08:28 AM
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jonthepain jonthepain is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CutterCutter View Post
Let the customers come to you and quit fighting the rejection.
that's a good point
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