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  #1  
Old 06-19-2011, 12:19 PM
mdavenport mdavenport is offline
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help needed with my lawn please

hi,

my lawn was seeded in sept 2009 after having of lot of soil dragged away by a digger to get it level. the first half of the lawn had a lot more of this done than the 2nd half as this was part of a field that was well established and level however we did have it seeded as the original turf was dug off.

last year it appeared to be ok and green, however this year i noticed the first half to be quite yellow/brown around march/april so i got focus's evergreen complete equivelent and spread it over the first half only. with in 1-2 weeks my lawn has transformed into this lush green lawn that needed cutting twice a week. now 2-3 months on this has gone back to being browny/yellow.

i did treat the 2nd half that was originally part of the field as this had quite a lot of weeks in. it has got rid of these and is still lush and green.

below is a photo taken today of the lawn. you can clearly see that the first half is bad and the 2nd half good. you will also see a few parts of the first half that look ok, however this is simply where i wheeled the feed trolley where i had missed parts originally.

ive got another 6-8 bags to treat the whole lawn again but dont know if i am doing the best thing to treat this and wondered that in another 6 weeks it will be back as it is now (looking like its dying).

i am looking for a long term solution to this. i have read about slow release fertilizer but wanted to check other peoples thoughts and opinions before i spend much more..

i look forward to your suggestions.

regards
md
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Old 06-19-2011, 03:13 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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I am going to save that picture as a example of how not to fertilize.
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  #3  
Old 06-19-2011, 03:21 PM
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Groomer Groomer is offline
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I would seriously consider converting that to one of those ancient indian religious landing zone type places that have been photographed so often over the years.
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Old 06-19-2011, 03:53 PM
DavesLL DavesLL is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavenport View Post
my lawn was seeded in sept 2009 after having of lot of soil dragged away by a digger to get it level.
That seems key to me; they removed soil from the yard? Top soil is different from the earth underneath the top soil; what's underneath isn't nearly as good for sustaining growth and healthy plants. I'd say pull some soil samples and have them tested; you may need to have the soil amended, or drop some compost or something.

For your samples, pull (and mark) a sample from the 'good' and 'bad' parts of the lawn, and see if they differ.
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:40 PM
mdavenport mdavenport is offline
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:44 PM
mdavenport mdavenport is offline
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Ok will look to get some samples. Can these be tested yourself with something from the local DIY store or do you have to have professional to analyse?

Would there be any value in fertilising this again? Could this help it establish more?

FYI, I will try to be more careful on the fertilising as to not make it look like some ancient grounds.
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:45 PM
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Georgia Lawn Works LLC Georgia Lawn Works LLC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
I am going to save that picture as a example of how not to fertilize.
And i'm going to save this statement as an example of how to post useless information that has nothing to do with the original posters question.
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:47 PM
mdavenport mdavenport is offline
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Originally Posted by Georgia Lawn Works LLC View Post
And i'm going to save this statement as an example of how to post useless information that has nothing to do with the original posters question.
Thank you!
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:49 PM
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Georgia Lawn Works LLC Georgia Lawn Works LLC is offline
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Originally Posted by mdavenport View Post
Ok will look to get some samples. Can these be tested yourself with something from the local DIY store or do you have to have professional to analyse?

Would there be any value in fertilising this again? Could this help it establish more?

FYI, I will try to be more careful on the fertilising as to not make it look like some ancient grounds.
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Before you do any more treatments it would be wise if you got soil samples. This way you are not wasting time and money on something that might not even fix the problem. You can get them from your local John Deer Landscapes (Lesco) or similar ag supply store.


As far as the fertilizing goes, I'm not sure your problem is from anything YOU did while applying the chemical and was probably just a temp fix (Which also made it look good for a short period of time) to the real problem that has obviously come back.
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Old 06-20-2011, 10:27 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Application of some box store stuff. The "Name" of that stuff meant nothing to me, so there is no way of knowing what you put down. The question is, Do you?

My guess is a bunch of water soluable N and probly pre-m, and all you need is more N and be careful of N burn...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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