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  #21  
Old 06-23-2011, 04:45 PM
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GreenI.A. GreenI.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazchazo View Post
It's dark now, so I can't really run any test right now, but tomorrow morning I am going to run it for 10 minutes and see if it gives off too much leakage. The leakage isn't too bad, but I believe the water is coming from the head of the sprinkler. I took apart the head and body and cleaned them all out and I used plastic threading tape for the head and the connection of the base of the sprinkler to the funny pipe. It seemed okay when I tested it. I think it's going to be fine.

For now, I need to find the valve or find out where I need to shut off the water. I THOUGHT I found the valve box, and I looked inside, but it was the water meter box and somehow there is no box for the valves, which is pretty weird. I found this pump with 2 T handles. I thought it might be for the gas line, so i did not touch it. But if there is no valves of the sprinklers, where can the valves be located? is it possible that they put the valves underground in the dirt? I looked everywhere in the backyard, sides of the house and I found no valve box, but a water meter box.

I will also get a picture of the white piece of plastic I found tomorrow. I will take a picture of the sprinkler itself and make a diagram of where I see water and I will take a picture of it while it is on.

Like said above by others, a lot of these questions an quickly be answered if you can get some photos posted. As far as the valves being buried it is fairly common especially with older neglected systems. Down your way it is a common practice to run a main pipe with the valves for each zone scatered about the yard. So if you have a zone for the front, a zone for the back, 1 for the side and another for the other side, then you may have a zone valve buried in each of those respected areas. Usually in a 6" round valve box, which is left alone can quickly become covered in grass or mulch. Up here it is more common to bury all of the valves together in one large box beside the house. Even these larger boxes can become grown over with grass or covered with mulch within a few seasons.

So more than likely, yes your valves are probably buried in grass right now, a reputable irrigation company will have trackers and will be able to trace the wires underground and find all of your valves.


Another thing I wanted to coment on was about the "Plumbers Plastic Thread Sealing Tape", if you are referring to Teflon Tape, the white tape that is used on threaded joints, this is not to seal the joint. Teflon Tape is used as a lubricant alowing you to securly tighten the fittings together.


Really all of your problems can be solved by hooking up with a full irrigation provider, who will quickly solve all of this for you. I would stear away from a landscape company who sidelines in irrigation while they may quote cheaper by the hour the cost will add up. A reputable irrigation company will have the proper tools to quickly locate all of your valves, saving many labor hours
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  #22  
Old 06-27-2011, 07:14 AM
Teach123 Teach123 is offline
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I agree with Riggle above. As my neighborhood lawn Nazi it is hard for me to understand why anyone would want to kill their turf for good. I mean you have an irrigation system and $20/month extra is nothing in my opinion! I would have though it would be more where you are in Texas.

Although a home's value is not affected by the lawn, the curb appeal is. My home is by far the best looking in the neighborhood. And one reason why is my lush manicured lawn that people slow down to view. I am pretty anal, but I do know if I ever go to sell my house, I won't have trouble attracting interested buyers.

It sounds like you hate spending time on it because you get cruddy results, but I think if you get the right local knowledgeable person, they would be able to help you establish and maintain a lawn and surrounding landscape you can be proud of and for a reasonable amount of money.

Just my thought..good luck
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  #23  
Old 06-27-2011, 12:37 PM
damnfingers damnfingers is offline
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Agree with above...lack of a lawn may not decrease the value of the home but it will definitely decrease the number of offers (if any) you receive when you want to sell. Why would anyone want to pay full price for a home then have to dump more money into the lawn when there are so many houses for sale with nice lawns?

It's cheaper to water and mow.
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  #24  
Old 06-27-2011, 01:02 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by damnfingers View Post
Why would anyone want to pay full price for a home then have to dump more money into the lawn when there are so many houses for sale with nice lawns?
Not everyone wants a lawn.
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  #25  
Old 06-27-2011, 01:10 PM
damnfingers damnfingers is offline
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I would think that if you lived in a house with an underground sprinkler system that the neighborhood would be one where appearances are important. While not everyone may want a lawn I doubt seriously they'd want a weed bed where one should be.
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  #26  
Old 06-27-2011, 02:04 PM
Teach123 Teach123 is offline
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Agree with damnfingers. I know that not everyone really cares about a lawn, but this person obviously cares a little bit or he/she wouldn't have tried to get their lawn going. I would just hate for his curb appeal to suffer simply because they think that establishing and maintaining a healthy attractive lawn is too much work. It can be done and will make neighbors/home associations very happy.

Again, just my opinion.
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  #27  
Old 06-27-2011, 02:52 PM
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Capemay Eagle Capemay Eagle is offline
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I would just say do as you would winterizing the irrigation system. Blow the lines out and shut the valve off! Depending on how big your lawn is, maybe you could put in decretive stones or gravel? Most of the shore homes here have stones put in. I don't know why, but I have come up with that they are vacation homes and people don't want the hassle of lawn maintenance with a summer home, it does look nice with some of the homes. Most of the newer homes built along the shoreline are side by sides now, so they pretty much use the whole lot and concrete the rest, mostly driveway space. Probably a few options out there for you if you would like a nice yard with out grass.
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  #28  
Old 06-27-2011, 06:35 PM
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GreenI.A. GreenI.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nepatsfan View Post
Wonderful suggestions....thanks for your input! So helpful to everyone. Do you install irrigation systems or just maintain them?
he could still use the irrigation with the decrative stone. Think about it that stuff is usually pretty dusty, you could run the irrigation to keep the dust down. Or have you ever walked on decorative stone barefoot in August, that stuff gets hot, you could use the irrigation to help keep it cool

On a note about the decorative stone. Alot of communities in hotter climates are trying to stear customers away from them. For example I know of cities in Navada that where paying customers to tear out their lawns and replae them with decorative stone to reduce water usage. I know of a person who lives in one of those cities, that then reversed it and where paying for people to reinstall their lawns. Turns out the stone lawns where getting so warm that they were increasing the temperature in the houses, resulting in more electricity usage. The increase in electricity was much more than the savings in water
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  #29  
Old 06-27-2011, 06:46 PM
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kirk1701 kirk1701 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazchazo View Post
I dealed with too many lawn problems, weeds growing everywhere. 2 months ago, my yard was half-filled with crabgrass, which I killed. I have this St. Augustine grass which I kept growing healthy now, but with this drought problem in the area and the extremely dry weather, I was thinking to let my grass die, let the weeds in and don't do ANY more work on the lawns. I am tired of wasting my time and energy to get a good lawn, which will never happen any time soon.

When we first moved in, we poked a hole in one of the irrigation system pipes and left it alone for 2 years. The backyard irrigation system was working but 2 days ago, I hit one of the the sprinkler heads and I thought I made a hole in it. I looked at it, the sprinkler head was fine, but when I turned it on, water was dripping from under it. I guess when I moved the head, it broke the bottom or the elbow pipe that came to the head. I looked at it, it looked fine, but water gapes out of it a bit when I turn the system on. I thought maybe I can replace the elbow, I tried taking out the elbow out of the pipe, but the elbow didn't come out and I didn't pull harder because I thought I might brake it. If I brake it, water will run without stopping, the irrigation systems have water in them already. I just left it alone and I am tired of these sorts of problems.

My water bill increased by 20 dollars a month because of no rain for about 5 months and I had to water the lawn and this drought is driving everyone crazy. My folks don't know anything about lawns or irrigation, and don't care about it either. They said if we can turn off this irrigation system for good.


My only question is, if I let the lawns die out, and turn off the irrigation system valves for good, and I were to sell this house, would the price be effected by too much, or will this cause any type of problem or devalue my land?

~Thanks

The front yard looks uglier than ever, but I used round up to kill the weeds that make me mow more, so I don't mow. I have no grass growing except wild bermuda grass, the St. Augustine is almost dried out. The only grass I have is wild bermuda that came out of no where. It looks ugly, but I don't really mow anymore, and I kill the weeds that make me mow.

Where is the irrigation system valve located anyway? The side of the house has 2 of these pipe things with a T handle. There is this underground box thing too, I believe the water meter is there though.
I didn't bother to read through all three pages so someone might have already said this. I can say it from experience since you say "and I were to sell this house".

When and if you sell the house it will most likely be inspected by the new owners before closing, guess what; yep your resposible for the repairs.

Been here done this so best thing you can do is get the irrigation fixed now and use it till you sell it
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  #30  
Old 06-27-2011, 10:51 PM
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Hineline Hineline is offline
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The seasonal adjustment is something I show the customers that have good hands on with their controller. If each zone is pretty much dialed in water usage wise then just use the % adjustment throughout the season.
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