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  #31  
Old 08-08-2011, 11:43 AM
Mxrider52 Mxrider52 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maynardGkeynes View Post
Just make sure the fert has some P in it for the rooting. Clay will soak up all the lime you can give it, so check the ph of course. I'd also throw some perennial rye in there so you have something green next spring, when you renovate with bermudagrass. You should also ask the extension guys about improving the soil composition, due to all the clay.

Oh ok thank. What if I just buy a kit and test the soil myself? Will that work? I thought about putting some topsoil down too to help.
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  #32  
Old 08-08-2011, 12:02 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Originally Posted by Mxrider52 View Post
Oh ok thank. What if I just buy a kit and test the soil myself? Will that work? I thought about putting some topsoil down too to help.
The home kits I;ve seen make you test each element separately Ph N P K. They work OK, but its a pain. With the state ext kit they do the work for you, u know its done right. and it costs $8. I'd also get an opinion on that clay, which I don't see like that in my area. That would concern me in terms of compaction, runoff etc. You need to deal with that if the client is demanding.
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  #33  
Old 08-09-2011, 10:00 PM
Mxrider52 Mxrider52 is offline
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Originally Posted by maynardGkeynes View Post
The home kits I;ve seen make you test each element separately Ph N P K. They work OK, but its a pain. With the state ext kit they do the work for you, u know its done right. and it costs $8. I'd also get an opinion on that clay, which I don't see like that in my area. That would concern me in terms of compaction, runoff etc. You need to deal with that if the client is demanding.
oh got you. Yea ill probably just take a soil sample to them than. Well the clay is really dry. We had not got rain in a while and temperatures in high 90s. Client not demanding just wanted me to take a look at it and see if it was something I wanted to tackle, he just wanting to look into getting it fixed. I do other things for him as well.
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  #34  
Old 09-02-2011, 07:58 PM
Mxrider52 Mxrider52 is offline
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Hey guys I got the soil testing done, so what can you guys tell me? I am pretty sure I marked ryegrass as the grass but oh well they showed me recommendations for bermuda which we are going to plant in the spring. So can you guys help me out and explain to me what all I need to do?
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  #35  
Old 09-02-2011, 08:11 PM
Mxrider52 Mxrider52 is offline
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Guess it would help if I posted the report
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  #36  
Old 09-02-2011, 08:51 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Originally Posted by Mxrider52 View Post
Hey guys I got the soil testing done, so what can you guys tell me? I am pretty sure I marked ryegrass as the grass but oh well they showed me recommendations for bermuda which we are going to plant in the spring. So can you guys help me out and explain to me what all I need to do?
I'd get that lime down now along with the P (shockingly bad) and what else they recommend. But your issue #1 now is erosion, so get that ryegrass planted ASAP to stabilize that soil NOW. In the spring, apply Roundup to kill off the rye, followed by slit seeding with Bermuda. You will be fine.
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  #37  
Old 09-02-2011, 08:55 PM
Mxrider52 Mxrider52 is offline
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Originally Posted by maynardGkeynes View Post
I'd get that lime down now along with the P (shockingly bad) and what else they recommend. But your issue #1 now is erosion, so get that ryegrass planted ASAP to stabilize that soil NOW. In the spring, apply Roundup to kill off the rye, followed by slit seeding with Bermuda. You will be fine.
So I need to put down 60 lbs lime along with 2 lbs P per 1000 sqft?

I guess this weekend would be a good time to put it down too since we are suppose to be getting quite a bit of rain over the next 4 days.

Last edited by Mxrider52; 09-02-2011 at 09:04 PM.
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  #38  
Old 09-02-2011, 08:58 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Originally Posted by Mxrider52 View Post
So I need to put down 60 lbs lime along with 2 lbs P per 1000 sqft?
Yes on the lime. They say P in the spring, but I would do 1/2 now to root the rye, and 1/2 in the spring for the bermudagrass. They may not have realized you were reseeding now. The P is for the roots, which is what holds your soil together. I might also split the lime a bit, because you have a serious leaching problem until you get some erosion control via the rye. The lime would wash out before the spring. With that much clay, the danger of having too much lime is minimal, so you can add more later.
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  #39  
Old 09-02-2011, 09:50 PM
Mxrider52 Mxrider52 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maynardGkeynes View Post
Yes on the lime. They say P in the spring, but I would do 1/2 now to root the rye, and 1/2 in the spring for the bermudagrass. They may not have realized you were reseeding now. The P is for the roots, which is what holds your soil together. I might also split the lime a bit, because you have a serious leaching problem until you get some erosion control via the rye. The lime would wash out before the spring. With that much clay, the danger of having too much lime is minimal, so you can add more later.
Oh ok. Well I thought the lime was just there to basically raise the soil PH to make it suitable for growing? Do you have any recommendations on a brand of lime to use or whether to use fast acting lime or regular lime?

So what is potash? It says under maintenance to apply recommended potash in the fall. Should that be something I should do now? So how soon after I put down lime should I put down Rye? Or should it be vice versa?

Sorry for all the questions. I am just learning all this still. My friend was to be helping me, but he got in a financial bind and than screwed me over so now we do not speak.
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  #40  
Old 09-02-2011, 11:33 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mxrider52 View Post
Oh ok. Well I thought the lime was just there to basically raise the soil PH to make it suitable for growing? Do you have any recommendations on a brand of lime to use or whether to use fast acting lime or regular lime?

So what is potash? It says under maintenance to apply recommended potash in the fall. Should that be something I should do now? So how soon after I put down lime should I put down Rye? Or should it be vice versa?

Sorry for all the questions. I am just learning all this still. My friend was to be helping me, but he got in a financial bind and than screwed me over so now we do not speak.
Potash is K. I would use a standard slow release NPK fertilizer already mixed (like Scotts, Vigro or a generic version) from Home Depot, applied according to the label. Unfortunately, they seem to be eliminating P from the major homeowner brands, so you will need to check the analysis on the bag to make sure it has P. (The starter fertilizers almost all have P, but they are overpriced and not always slow release.) The guys at the store might be able to help, or go to a Lesco, if there is one near you -- they are more expert. Just use standard lime, the white powdery stuff that is real cheap. Your PH is too low. I'd let the lime soak in for a few days before seeding, but actually, it shouldn't hurt the seed either way. This is not that hard a job from the soil chemistry standpoint. What is tricky is keeping the application on the bare surfaces on the incline, which is why the sooner you can get the rye established, the better everything will go.
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