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  #21  
Old 09-07-2011, 10:02 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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I read tomarrow
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  #22  
Old 09-07-2011, 10:09 PM
MowingMowingMowing MowingMowingMowing is offline
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And don't waste your $$$ on any type of "online" school, those degrees aren't worth the paper they are written on.
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  #23  
Old 09-07-2011, 10:52 PM
cuttin-to-the-Max cuttin-to-the-Max is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MowingMowingMowing View Post
And don't waste your $$$ on any type of "online" school, those degrees aren't worth the paper they are written on.
I took an online class and IT WAS H3LL! Online classes are more work than going in. Its double the work! Took a few business classes that way but its not for the normal joe-blo. VERY time consuming but the good thing (i guess.) Is it's self paced. But with a family and being at work 24/7 its really hard to do. The classes do tend to cost significantly less.

Just sayinngg.....Take it or leave it!
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  #24  
Old 09-07-2011, 11:15 PM
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lifetree lifetree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingdutch16 View Post
Sooo lately a lot of people ask me where do you work. I just tell i mow lawns for my self. 9/10 times I get a response like this, Mowing is not a job... its just so that you can make a little extra money. ...
Just say that you agree with them ... because mowing isn't a job, "it's an adventure" !!
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  #25  
Old 09-07-2011, 11:19 PM
Roger Roger is offline
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Some comments here about "going to school" and getting a job miss the mark of higher education. You are making some very bad assumptions regarding higher education and marketable skills.

College is not as much about "getting an education so you can get a job" as it is about learning to learn. I've not heard any of the objectors speak about life-long learning needs. You have only spoken about the cost vs. getting a job afterward. Some (many?) liberal arts colleges never intend to prepare one for a career. They intend to educate the student so that they have developed an appetite for learning and the study skills for good life-long learning. These students are much better prepared to go on for further education in law, medicine, or other professional fields.

At this point in time, young people will have four or five careers before retiring. I chuckle at the 25 year old LCO who says "I intend to mow lawns until I retire." Sorry, not going to happen! Even those with good college education will have several career paths. There is nothing mystical about this situation. The bigger question: Who will be prepared, and to be nimble enough, to make career changes?

I know some 25, and 30 year old people right now who are unemployed. Why? Because they are unable to navigate a career change only a few years out of school. They went to college with a mindset of education=>job. That is not happening, and they need to make changes. But, they were so focused on a single job that when it went away, they were high and dry, and continue to be so. They did not continue education once they left college. Again, life-long learning is key to being ready for change.

No, a higher education is not a guarantee for life-time employment. But, the opportunities afforded to the educated person are far greater than the one who has been pushing a lawn mower for 10 years, and needs to make a change. Again, I know some people, late 30s, and 40s, who never pursued higher education. They have muddled from low-paying job, to low-paying job, without much expectation of advancement.

With all that being said, there are great opportunities for those who pass through trade schools, apprentice programs, and up the ranks. These people are in demand, and have furthered themselves with learning a trade well, and have performed well on the job. But, again, it is all about learning beyond high school years. And, keeping pace required refresher course, or training in new technologies to keep pace.

Let me digress briefly on a related topic. Some threads on LS speak about those who wish to maintain their business while going to college. Exchanges happen between parties who have done it, or who are doing it. They speak about clumping classes on certain days, leaving open days for mowing, landscaping, etc. This may be necessary to make financial ends work. But, in terms of education, I consider this approach a disaster. The focus is only getting to class, getting the class work done, and passing the course. That is fine for academic purposes, but it misses a much larger point of the educational experience. Missing is the interaction with others in clubs, groups, etc. Missing is the leadership development opportunities outside the classroom. Just finishing the classroom work is adequate, but is to leave so much on the table.

When I read threads that speak about "I went for two years and did me no good," I wonder what else was being done besides the classroom. Some posts even speak about having worked through an entire Bachelors program, while keeping the business running, having bunched classes on a nearby campus to allow days to mow lawns. Shudder, shudder, shudder ... The follow up is "it did me no good, I should have just built my business larger...." Yes, one may hold a degree in hand, but hold little in the way of higher education.

OK, ... rambled enough. This is a topic that concerns me greatly. I am astounded at some of the comments in these threads about how little some people understand education. Maybe nobody has gotten this far to read it all. If you have, thank you.
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  #26  
Old 09-08-2011, 01:15 AM
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GreenI.A. GreenI.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger View Post
Some comments here about "going to school" and getting a job miss the mark of higher education. You are making some very bad assumptions regarding higher education and marketable skills.

College is not as much about "getting an education so you can get a job" as it is about learning to learn. I've not heard any of the objectors speak about life-long learning needs. You have only spoken about the cost vs. getting a job afterward. Some (many?) liberal arts colleges never intend to prepare one for a career. They intend to educate the student so that they have developed an appetite for learning and the study skills for good life-long learning. These students are much better prepared to go on for further education in law, medicine, or other professional fields.

At this point in time, young people will have four or five careers before retiring. I chuckle at the 25 year old LCO who says "I intend to mow lawns until I retire." Sorry, not going to happen! Even those with good college education will have several career paths. There is nothing mystical about this situation. The bigger question: Who will be prepared, and to be nimble enough, to make career changes?

I know some 25, and 30 year old people right now who are unemployed. Why? Because they are unable to navigate a career change only a few years out of school. They went to college with a mindset of education=>job. That is not happening, and they need to make changes. But, they were so focused on a single job that when it went away, they were high and dry, and continue to be so. They did not continue education once they left college. Again, life-long learning is key to being ready for change.

No, a higher education is not a guarantee for life-time employment. But, the opportunities afforded to the educated person are far greater than the one who has been pushing a lawn mower for 10 years, and needs to make a change. Again, I know some people, late 30s, and 40s, who never pursued higher education. They have muddled from low-paying job, to low-paying job, without much expectation of advancement.

With all that being said, there are great opportunities for those who pass through trade schools, apprentice programs, and up the ranks. These people are in demand, and have furthered themselves with learning a trade well, and have performed well on the job. But, again, it is all about learning beyond high school years. And, keeping pace required refresher course, or training in new technologies to keep pace.

Let me digress briefly on a related topic. Some threads on LS speak about those who wish to maintain their business while going to college. Exchanges happen between parties who have done it, or who are doing it. They speak about clumping classes on certain days, leaving open days for mowing, landscaping, etc. This may be necessary to make financial ends work. But, in terms of education, I consider this approach a disaster. The focus is only getting to class, getting the class work done, and passing the course. That is fine for academic purposes, but it misses a much larger point of the educational experience. Missing is the interaction with others in clubs, groups, etc. Missing is the leadership development opportunities outside the classroom. Just finishing the classroom work is adequate, but is to leave so much on the table.

When I read threads that speak about "I went for two years and did me no good," I wonder what else was being done besides the classroom. Some posts even speak about having worked through an entire Bachelors program, while keeping the business running, having bunched classes on a nearby campus to allow days to mow lawns. Shudder, shudder, shudder ... The follow up is "it did me no good, I should have just built my business larger...." Yes, one may hold a degree in hand, but hold little in the way of higher education.

OK, ... rambled enough. This is a topic that concerns me greatly. I am astounded at some of the comments in these threads about how little some people understand education. Maybe nobody has gotten this far to read it all. If you have, thank you.
I read it all!!! and I agree with most of it up until you talk about clumping the classes together. For many if you want to go to school that is the only option. I did my bachelors at night, went full time 5 classes a semester. Some semesters I even had classes on Saturdays. Most the people in my classes were career driven adults who had day jobs, we were there to learn and didn't participate in clubs or other activities as we didn't have either the time or interest. As I stated above, I'm now working on my Masters. I have 4 classes on Tuesdays and Thursday mornings. I meet my guys, get them squared away for the day and when they leave the yard at 7am, I do too, to be at my first class at 8am. I'll be there till 2pm, then Ill hit the road for work. Thursdays I have just enough time to stop by to check up on them as I have to be back on campus for a 4 pm class. But I'm fortunate enough now to have guys working for me, that allow me the opportunity to do this. I have had times where I have been in my truck on my lap top in a clients driveway typing a paper as my guys are working in the yard. You do what works. But I will say this, every day I wish I had gone to school when I was 18 like my friends did, lived in a dorm and had that whole experience. At the time, I laughed at them driving s*** boxes as thats all they could afford with their part time pay, while I was driving a new $50k suv, working a great job with great pay. It took some time but they (for the most part) caught up and past me and now I'm the one trying to catch up. Like I just said, if I could go back I would have done it completely different. Now I have to get to bed as I have to be up in 4hrs as I have work to do before my 8am class.
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  #27  
Old 09-08-2011, 05:17 AM
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grassman177 grassman177 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CL&T View Post
best thing to do is stay in school!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I disagree. Who do you think many of those lowballers are? College grads who can't find work or those that had a good job then got laid off. You are way ahead of the game working and earning money right after high school instead of partying four years in some diploma mill, getting yourself $200K in debt then not finding work.

Don't get me started on how 50% of kids do not belong in college. If you don't have a clear goal and an excellent chance of employment upon graduation in your field when you enter a college you don't belong there.

On of the reasons this country is in the mess it's in is because of thinking like yours. We have a generation whose parents, mostly hard workers like ourselves back in the 50's, wanted a "better life" for their kids. So every kid had to have a college education and the result was they don't want to get their hands dirty, have an attitude towards those who do and feel entitled to as much money as possible.

Being in the trades or doing manual work today is considered a stigma and so our workforce is rapidly declining as we retire and our sons or daughters aren't taking our places as they once did. So we are inundated with illegals "doing the work nobody wants to do".

There's the rest of your lowballers.
good points, i am one of those that did both and i would say that is a very wise decision to make.
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  #28  
Old 09-08-2011, 05:20 AM
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grassman177 grassman177 is offline
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some really wise comments from you guys, amidst all the bs....no offense
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  #29  
Old 09-08-2011, 07:42 AM
yardguy28 yardguy28 is offline
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roger makes some good points but i don't share this view.

the view i have is that some people do well and are ment for college, degrees, learning in a class room environment and some aren't.

others do well just getting a job right after highschool or moving up in the job they had during highschool.

some enjoy hoping from job to job through out there life, others want something more permanent.

as long as your happy in life and are able to provide for yourself and if you have one a family i don't think it matters what path you take. there is no best path.
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  #30  
Old 09-08-2011, 08:02 AM
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McFarland_Lawn_Care McFarland_Lawn_Care is offline
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I did not go to college and kinda wish I had now. Instead I am working on a business degree while running the business at the same time - very tough at times. Lots of good advice people have given you here and I'm not going to beat a dead horse but I will say this. No matter WHAT you do in life, be sure to pic a "job" or career that makes you HAPPY. THEN educate yourself about every aspect of that job and since you enjoy it then it will be easy since you have a passion for it!!! That being said if you are not sure what you want to do for a career, then it's a good idea to get some college under your belt, even basic classes will be good. It took me about 7 years and several different jobs for me to figure out what my calling was and have been happy ever since!! Good luck bud, and congrats for working you butt off while most kids are lazy and playing games. I mowed my first lawn for money when I was 12 years old - push mower and hand scissor-like trimmer - that's right!! =D
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