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  #51  
Old 10-09-2011, 02:45 PM
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Here's one of the carvings that we delivered on friday @ Furry Creek. Pretty awesome, about 17 feet tall, one piece of two that they did in 5 days, all with chainsaws.



Talk about timing, been pretty dead for work all summer and then I get a call from this show and they want me available for the rest of the show, but alas, going to Kelowna next weekend to start training!
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  #52  
Old 10-09-2011, 02:46 PM
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I could live with that!
Sorry, newbies have to start out as a greaser, and you live in a port-o-potty, good news though, you can take a shower in it, but the water might make you blue and it smells like poo.
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  #53  
Old 10-09-2011, 03:22 PM
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Sorry, newbies have to start out as a greaser, and you live in a port-o-potty, good news though, you can take a shower in it, but the water might make you blue and it smells like poo.
Then I could be part of the Blue Man Poop.
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  #54  
Old 10-09-2011, 03:25 PM
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Then I could be part of the Blue Man Poop.
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Cha-right, you lack talent, that's something you seem to think a school will teach you.
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  #55  
Old 10-09-2011, 05:27 PM
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Cha-right, you lack talent, that's something you seem to think a school will teach you.
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You're right, total idiot for thinking training will teach me how to do something. I can't imagine how amazing you must have been at your job the first day!

I may not have all the skills yet, but that's what I intend to learn over the next few months, then with seat time maybe one day I'll live up to your standard of talent Ron. That's all I could ever wish for. There will be a huge void in my heart until the day I get your approval.
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  #56  
Old 10-09-2011, 05:42 PM
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You're right, total idiot for thinking training will teach me how to do something. I can't imagine how amazing you must have been at your job the first day!

I may not have all the skills yet, but that's what I intend to learn over the next few months, then with seat time maybe one day I'll live up to your standard of talent Ron. That's all I could ever wish for. There will be a huge void in my heart until the day I get your approval.
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I dropped out of school when I was 17, and I already had 1 full summer of seat time in my family's business, but guess what I did on my first day out of school?
Shovel and grade stick work.
I did that for about 2 months in between running a hoe or the Bobcat for half a day. It wasn't until I gained enough trust and knowledge of how to do tasks that I moved up to the machines full time. Then after another year I was given the keys to the truck and all I did was Bobcat work and move it from site to site, but I still lacked skills to complete the bigger projects on my own. Now, after 16 years with the family business, I have a full plate of experience, but I still turn work down that I really hate, like digging around sensitive pipe lines, municipal work and slope work for lagoons.
I can proudly say I have accomplished everything with out going to a school.
Even my Class 1 license was done with out any training from a school, and that was due in part to seat time off road in my dad's trucks moving fill around.
So yes, I have very little respect for anyone who wants to take the easy way and get a certificate that shows they are a good operator.


Now it's your turn for your rebuttal.
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  #57  
Old 10-09-2011, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by bobcat_ron View Post
I dropped out of school when I was 17, and I already had 1 full summer of seat time in my family's business, but guess what I did on my first day out of school?
Shovel and grade stick work.
I did that for about 2 months in between running a hoe or the Bobcat for half a day. It wasn't until I gained enough trust and knowledge of how to do tasks that I moved up to the machines full time. Then after another year I was given the keys to the truck and all I did was Bobcat work and move it from site to site, but I still lacked skills to complete the bigger projects on my own. Now, after 16 years with the family business, I have a full plate of experience, but I still turn work down that I really hate, like digging around sensitive pipe lines, municipal work and slope work for lagoons.
I can proudly say I have accomplished everything with out going to a school.
Even my Class 1 license was done with out any training from a school, and that was due in part to seat time off road in my dad's trucks moving fill around.
So yes, I have very little respect for anyone who wants to take the easy way and get a certificate that shows they are a good operator.


Now it's your turn for your rebuttal.
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I too understand the importance of experience. I don't think of this as a short cut, but as my entry point. I never had a family business that I could fall into.

I gained all my film/tv experience by putting in time as well. Started sweeping the floor at the local tv station, couple weeks later was allowed to turn on the lights, then the cameras, then operate them, then thrown onto the sound board. Started working for other companies doing bigger projects, live tv, started my own, did that for a few years. Went to film school to master the technical side of things that i had missed from just getting tossed in there. Did well from that, started travelling and working all over the country, and a handful of projects in other countries. I did well and was hired to shoot/edit a tv series. Did that for 3 years, economy collapsed, jobs were cut. Since things picked up I have worked on dozens of large productions, but yet again the industry has dropped out in Vancouver.

I did it with that industry, and I love my job, when I have one.

Heavy equipment has always interested me, but I'm not as lucky as you Ron, i can't call up my pops and ask for a job, so off to school I go. I know it's not going to make me the best, hell I'm sure that I'll suck at it, AT FIRST. I know it takes seat time. Without a connection in the industry this is the route i've decided to take. Learn the basics, go work in the trenches, wherever that may be, I'm not expecting to get anything close to home.

Hopefully having training will show that I am responsible around a machine, and will give an employer the confidence to allow me into theirs. As others have said, this is not the economy to spend the time/money on training a green operator, so I'm putting down my own cash for that part.

Seeing as you've already be willing to put in so much time providing me with your valuable knowledge, maybe when I'm done you'll have me out to operate a shovel for yah. That way you can show me how it's really done!
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  #58  
Old 10-09-2011, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by DTEP View Post
I too understand the importance of experience. I don't think of this as a short cut, but as my entry point. I never had a family business that I could fall into.

I gained all my film/tv experience by putting in time as well. Started sweeping the floor at the local tv station, couple weeks later was allowed to turn on the lights, then the cameras, then operate them, then thrown onto the sound board. Started working for other companies doing bigger projects, live tv, started my own, did that for a few years. Went to film school to master the technical side of things that i had missed from just getting tossed in there. Did well from that, started travelling and working all over the country, and a handful of projects in other countries. I did well and was hired to shoot/edit a tv series. Did that for 3 years, economy collapsed, jobs were cut. Since things picked up I have worked on dozens of large productions, but yet again the industry has dropped out in Vancouver.

I did it with that industry, and I love my job, when I have one.

Heavy equipment has always interested me, but I'm not as lucky as you Ron, i can't call up my pops and ask for a job, so off to school I go. I know it's not going to make me the best, hell I'm sure that I'll suck at it, AT FIRST. I know it takes seat time. Without a connection in the industry this is the route i've decided to take. Learn the basics, go work in the trenches, wherever that may be, I'm not expecting to get anything close to home.

Hopefully having training will show that I am responsible around a machine, and will give an employer the confidence to allow me into theirs. As others have said, this is not the economy to spend the time/money on training a green operator, so I'm putting down my own cash for that part.

Seeing as you've already be willing to put in so much time providing me with your valuable knowledge, maybe when I'm done you'll have me out to operate a shovel for yah. That way you can show me how it's really done!
Sorry, but we have had very bad luck with newbies from schools and we just don't trust anyone with farming knowledge and backgrounds to work with us, city slickers make the worst operators in our business, especially newbies.
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  #59  
Old 10-09-2011, 06:25 PM
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Sorry to hear that, I know how frustrating newbies can be!
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  #60  
Old 10-10-2011, 01:05 AM
mxridernorth mxridernorth is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobcat_ron View Post
I dropped out of school when I was 17, and I already had 1 full summer of seat time in my family's business, but guess what I did on my first day out of school?
Shovel and grade stick work.
I did that for about 2 months in between running a hoe or the Bobcat for half a day. It wasn't until I gained enough trust and knowledge of how to do tasks that I moved up to the machines full time. Then after another year I was given the keys to the truck and all I did was Bobcat work and move it from site to site, but I still lacked skills to complete the bigger projects on my own. Now, after 16 years with the family business, I have a full plate of experience, but I still turn work down that I really hate, like digging around sensitive pipe lines, municipal work and slope work for lagoons.
I can proudly say I have accomplished everything with out going to a school.
Even my Class 1 license was done with out any training from a school, and that was due in part to seat time off road in my dad's trucks moving fill around.
So yes, I have very little respect for anyone who wants to take the easy way and get a certificate that shows they are a good operator.


Now it's your turn for your rebuttal.
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Without is one word. You should have stick around for that last year.
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