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  #31  
Old 11-27-2011, 11:48 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Not true. In ag, certified applicators are allowed to to use chemicals I wish were legal for turf and ornamentals.
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  #32  
Old 11-28-2011, 10:18 AM
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GreenT GreenT is offline
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Oh no.... I'm heartbroken....

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  #33  
Old 11-28-2011, 06:53 PM
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the_bug_guy the_bug_guy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenT View Post
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I'm no chemical applicator guru but it may have something to do with agriculture practices -sugarcane agronomy- as opposed to turf.

Preventive control requires the use of long residual insecticides, such as imidacloprid (Merit®, Season-Long Grub Control®), thiamethoxam (Meridian®), halofenozide (Mach2®, Ortho Grub-B-Gon®, Grub-Ex®), clothianidin (Arena®), or chlorantraniliprole (Acelepryn®). These products give good control of newly hatched grubs. The best application period is during the month or so before egg hatch until the time when very young grubs are present. Preventive control requires the use of long residual insecticides. Professional combination products (e.g., Allectus®, Aloft®) have a pyrethroid and a neonicotinoid insecticide premixed together, which could be used to try to reduce both adult and larval populations.
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most of the chemicals above in the neonicotinoid ( made from nicotine for all you smokers) line are systemic in nature. in other words adsorbed by the plant and when the little jerks eat the grass or plant they die. that is why it works so well chinch bugs.... the adult chinch bug does not damage the grass it is the babies that they are making by the thousands do.

The babies suck out the juices from the stolons and then throw up back into the plant and the stomach juices are what kills the st aug grass.

but u have to get it into the plant before they hatch out. imidacloprid or lesco's bandit will take up to six weeks to be adsorbed by the plant. i use it as a back up using conserve and bifenthrin mixed to spray and the granular. that way u get a quick kill and a long acting systemic control for all your problem insects.

your alternative is using azasol but at $50 an ounce and 6 ounces to an acre it is cost prohibitive except on someting you are going to lose because of major pest infestation.
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