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Old 11-20-2011, 07:20 AM
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BrettT BrettT is offline
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Deck Reconditioning - Charlottesville, VA 22901

Thanks to the expert help from David Hoover, Elephant Roof & Exterior Cleaning, Blue Ridge Roof Cleaning is now offering deck reconditioning. This deck was completed in Charlottesville, VA
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:13 PM
Oasis360 Oasis360 is offline
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Is it possible to pressure wash & recondition (stain / seal) a deck this time of year with the rain and nightly frost? How dry does the wood have to be to accept stain or sealer?
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Old 11-21-2011, 10:21 AM
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Everett Abrams Everett Abrams is offline
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It really depends on where you live and the climate. I am in the Northeast and at this time of year it is difficult to get the proper moisture level. It also depends on the coating whether or not it is oil-based or water-based. The best thing is to always check the manufacturers recommendations first because they have a guarantee on the product provided you follow their application instructions. Generally what I teach is that you are looking for 12%-15% moisture content to stain. There are so many variables now that include what is previously mentioned but also the species and type of wood. For example IPE you will have a tough time getting lower readings and you can stain this type of wood at 20% with no issues. The best thing is to use a moisture meter to determine moisture content. You should also inform the customer that you do this and even let them see what you are doing as this adds to your professionalism. Personally, we document the information on a "job sheet" for future reference. For example, Cabot will do everything they can to not be responsible for any failures. They will ask for a tape sample, ask if the deck is 20" or less to ground contact and so forth. If they come back and say the wood was too wet when stained and that is the cause of mold and mildew (which they often will) you will have documentation to refute with. Moisture meter come in various types from generic to all species of wood to more elaborate like one I have that actually accounts for types of wood and varying acceptable moisture readings.

BTW, Nice Before/After pics!
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Old 11-21-2011, 06:02 PM
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BrettT BrettT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everett Abrams View Post
It really depends on where you live and the climate. I am in the Northeast and at this time of year it is difficult to get the proper moisture level. It also depends on the coating whether or not it is oil-based or water-based. The best thing is to always check the manufacturers recommendations first because they have a guarantee on the product provided you follow their application instructions. Generally what I teach is that you are looking for 12%-15% moisture content to stain. There are so many variables now that include what is previously mentioned but also the species and type of wood. For example IPE you will have a tough time getting lower readings and you can stain this type of wood at 20% with no issues. The best thing is to use a moisture meter to determine moisture content. You should also inform the customer that you do this and even let them see what you are doing as this adds to your professionalism. Personally, we document the information on a "job sheet" for future reference. For example, Cabot will do everything they can to not be responsible for any failures. They will ask for a tape sample, ask if the deck is 20" or less to ground contact and so forth. If they come back and say the wood was too wet when stained and that is the cause of mold and mildew (which they often will) you will have documentation to refute with. Moisture meter come in various types from generic to all species of wood to more elaborate like one I have that actually accounts for types of wood and varying acceptable moisture readings.

BTW, Nice Before/After pics!
Very good information Everett!!
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