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  #21  
Old 11-28-2011, 09:07 PM
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GreenI.A. GreenI.A. is offline
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I run a dingo 425. I bought it used originally to use as a mini skid because alot of older homes in the older parts of Boston have to much limited axcess to get my full size skid in. After having the mini skid for a couple of months i sold my trencher and bought a trencher attachment and pipe puller attachment for the dingo. Both work great. My only complaint is that it is to slow when using it as a skid with a bucket or plow on it.
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  #22  
Old 11-28-2011, 10:32 PM
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ARGOS ARGOS is offline
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Location: On the road again.
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I have owned and used multiple minis and skids. I recently sold a lot of equipment, but kept my Thomas 85 because it was really handy. The Thomas has a 36" foot print and a 20 hp kuboto engine. I can squeeze in tight spaces and still have the power and convenience of a skid. Down side is that it is not tracked and the power exceeds its size. Compare to a mini I think the biggest down side is that it has tip over potential. Personally I would take a tracked mini first (toro dingo) and a wheeled skid over a wheeled mini. You not gonna find a tracked skid as small as a tracked mini, but you will find a wheeled skid as small as a wheeled mini.

Ps. We almost always use a sod cutter. Works great. Might be a regional thing.
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  #23  
Old 11-29-2011, 11:45 AM
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txgrassguy txgrassguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Leary View Post
Manpower is a waste of time and money. If you're trenching into an existing landscape, this "little trencher that could" is the answer, we've had two of them:
Mike, those disc type trenchers don't work in C. Texas. Won't cut rock and hard clay based soils. They are good for outlining landscape beds though, however for the cost I can get two beaners to define edges without the noise.
Taco fueled exhaust fumes are a problem sometimes but there is almost always a decent breeze - I just have to remember to stand up wind.
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  #24  
Old 11-29-2011, 07:27 PM
RandalatA1Sprinklers RandalatA1Sprinklers is offline
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Location: Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pblc View Post
I'm looking to pick up a second mini skid steer to work on our new irrigaiton crew next year. This will be our first year with irrigation so I'm completely new to the game. We have planned to concentrate on residential installs and small commercial jobs.

As I'm looking at trenchers to buy I see there are all different sizes and types. What size do most use for this type of work - how deep do the irrigation trenches need to go? We are located in the southeast missouri, northwest tennessee, west kentucky area.

Also I'm looking at a mini skid steer to tug the trencher around. Will a 20 horse gas engine be big enough - like on a Bobcat MT50 or Dingo 420... Or would it be smart to go bigger and diesel to complete these tasks.

Do most trench and then hard pipe in pvc or are you ripping and installing a flexible pipe?

Thanks for the help.
Here in Wisconsin we use poly pipe (blue is the best). Usually 1 1/4 main and 1 inch laterals. I have done big commercial jobs with 2 inch class 200 mainline that was looped. Big resort with hundreds of heads and needed every pound of pressure running up and down hills.
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  #25  
Old 11-29-2011, 07:30 PM
RandalatA1Sprinklers RandalatA1Sprinklers is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
Posts: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by pblc View Post
I'm looking to pick up a second mini skid steer to work on our new irrigaiton crew next year. This will be our first year with irrigation so I'm completely new to the game. We have planned to concentrate on residential installs and small commercial jobs.

As I'm looking at trenchers to buy I see there are all different sizes and types. What size do most use for this type of work - how deep do the irrigation trenches need to go? We are located in the southeast missouri, northwest tennessee, west kentucky area.

Also I'm looking at a mini skid steer to tug the trencher around. Will a 20 horse gas engine be big enough - like on a Bobcat MT50 or Dingo 420... Or would it be smart to go bigger and diesel to complete these tasks.

Do most trench and then hard pipe in pvc or are you ripping and installing a flexible pipe?

Thanks for the help.
Mainline 12" deep so valve boxes fit right in with no cutting, laterals are 8-10"
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  #26  
Old 11-29-2011, 08:34 PM
Mdirrigation Mdirrigation is offline
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Trenching and cutting sod , sounds like like mid 1970's methods . Vibratory plows around here since the early 1980's . I did a demo with a dingo with a plow on it , way too slow .
I have a trencher on a burkeen plow , I have used the trencher 2 times in the last 5 years , Once to lay in some 4 inch pipe , and once to trench for an electrician .
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  #27  
Old 11-29-2011, 10:17 PM
Irrigation Contractor Irrigation Contractor is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: South East
Posts: 273
I would love to plow, but the rock down here is on 99% of the jobs that we do. We like the Dingo's but they just do not hold up in the rock and I spent almost $13,000 on parts and chains for just 2 - 320D's this past season. This is one of the reason's we have to charge what we charge and we do the repairs in house.

Pulling pipe is so much faster than trenching, but add enough rocks to fill the bed of an import pickup truck on your average 12 zone system and we have to have equipment that may seem to be over kill by you guys up in the mid-west.

Most people that do irrigation do not need welders and plasma cutters either, but we use them on a weekly basis. LOL
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  #28  
Old 11-29-2011, 11:21 PM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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Plasma cutters? I don't even like the sound of that. What state are you in?
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  #29  
Old 11-30-2011, 02:45 PM
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txgrassguy txgrassguy is offline
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Location: south enough that spanish is necessary
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This thread is bad luck - I just smoked another hydraulic pump.
Wash plate was scored all to hell - talked to the guys and found out they decided to "add" hydraulic fluid which wasn't - it was a bucket of used oil from my tractor.
I swear if there was a bounty on dumbass employees I could retire tomorrow.
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  #30  
Old 11-30-2011, 03:22 PM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is offline
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Refuse like that has a way of getting into places you don't want it.
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