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Old 12-25-2011, 11:54 AM
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Spreading soybean meal now?

I am moving to a new home without the storage I have now. I wasn't able to get my new lawn seeded this fall. I used all my poultry compost for clients this season but I have about 10 bags of soybean meal remaining. Will it be a complete waste to put it on the bare ground at my new home during Ohio winter because of minimal or no microbial action? (It is sandy soil if it makes any difference to my question.)

This question is for those that use meals not those that think it is a waste any time of year.

BTW I was formerly known as "dirtandhoops" on Lawnsite.
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Old 12-25-2011, 12:44 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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What do you see happening to the meal in your 'mind's eye'?
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:42 PM
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Rotting......but wait......rotting is microbial action. Hmmm....good question, axe.

You know, after reading your vague postings on here for about three years. I think you should change your name to Smallsocrates.

"As for me, all I know is that I know nothing."--------Socrates
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Old 12-25-2011, 02:48 PM
NattyLawn NattyLawn is offline
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Keep the meal in a cool, dry place away from any critters, and spread in the spring. It will be fine, albeit a little more dusty.
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Old 12-25-2011, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NattyLawn View Post
Keep the meal in a cool, dry place away from any critters, and spread in the spring. It will be fine, albeit a little more dusty.
I know it will store fine; I don't want to take up the space storing it.
I don't have a storage barn in my new urban location. That's why I wanted to spread it now if I wouldn't be wasting it as organic matter or microbial feed.
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Old 12-25-2011, 03:53 PM
JCResources JCResources is offline
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Won't the meal just sit and mark time until the soil temp is warm enough for sufficient microbial activity?


Does soybean meal have pre-emergent qualities like corn gluten meal?

If so it'd make sense to wait until the site has been seeded and emerged well before application.

I'd feed it to the chickens over the winter.

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Old 12-25-2011, 04:09 PM
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I don't want my original question to get lost but just to answer JC:
I remember some research showing soybean meal might have some pre-emergent quality but it would take a large volume for an affect.
I wouldn't be spreading it that heavy.
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Old 12-26-2011, 01:22 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Anything laying on the ground under the snow is going to start to rot... 30 degree microbes, 40 degree microbes slowly doing their thing as the meal works its way into the dirt, preparing for Spring... once the temp hits your meal is already ahead of breaking down into its constituent parts and enriching the soil...

As long as it does blow away or wash away I can't see that there is a problem with storing it on the ground... of course I have seed on the bare ground overwinter as well... vague postings, indeed...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:58 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Anything laying on the ground under the snow is going to start to rot... 30 degree microbes, 40 degree microbes slowly doing their thing as the meal works its way into the dirt, preparing for Spring... once the temp hits your meal is already ahead of breaking down into its constituent parts and enriching the soil...

As long as it does blow away or wash away I can't see that there is a problem with storing it on the ground... of course I have seed on the bare ground overwinter as well... vague postings, indeed...
I agree with Smallaxe. Both compost or various types of meals need to be applied during fairly warm early to mid fall soil temperatures so that they have an opportunity to decompose X degree before the temps begin to drop.

A mechanical introduction of this medium into the soil profile will often help to hasten the degradation process. Or, in other words...core aerate very thoroughly preferably before the meal /compost application. Before renting the aerator, make sure the soil is moist to at least a depth of 4", but not sopping wet. Wait to apply a meal until after cores have thoroughly dried on the lawn because dry cores can't stick to an aerators tires as easily as wet cores.
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