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  #1  
Old 03-08-2012, 09:12 AM
Ijustwantausername's Avatar
Ijustwantausername Ijustwantausername is offline
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Join Date: May 2011
Location: Raleigh NC
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Whats the science behind "Do not fertilize tall fescue after March 15?"

I have tinkered with my own yard many times and fertilized after that and it did just fine.
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  #2  
Old 03-08-2012, 10:08 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
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Setting calendar dates already means, that its bad science...

What science is supposed to do is learn about the plants, as they are... Once we understand plants for what they are, we are then able to 'supplement' their development when and if supplements are needed...

Certain cultural practices do not hurt the plant that much, so they appear to be "Fine"...

We must always think of lawncare as caring for the plants and giving them what they need...

So the thing I need to know, scientifically is, What is your fescue doing right now? Does it need any help doing what it is doing?
Generally: the answer is No... It's Spring and "generally" most plants are just fine and it is best we don't mess with them...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #3  
Old 03-08-2012, 03:39 PM
fl-landscapes's Avatar
fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
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You know me, I have to needle you. Do you not contradict yourself when you say basing things on the calendar is bad science, then state "it's spring" plants should be fine. Did you not base your opinion of plants are fine in spring on a point of time (calendar)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Setting calendar dates already means, that its bad science...

What science is supposed to do is learn about the plants, as they are... Once we understand plants for what they are, we are then able to 'supplement' their development when and if supplements are needed...

Certain cultural practices do not hurt the plant that much, so they appear to be "Fine"...

We must always think of lawncare as caring for the plants and giving them what they need...

So the thing I need to know, scientifically is, What is your fescue doing right now? Does it need any help doing what it is doing?
Generally: the answer is No... It's Spring and "generally" most plants are just fine and it is best we don't mess with them...
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  #4  
Old 03-09-2012, 07:58 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,793
Quote:
Originally Posted by fl-landscapes View Post
You know me, I have to needle you. Do you not contradict yourself when you say basing things on the calendar is bad science, then state "it's spring" plants should be fine. Did you not base your opinion of plants are fine in spring on a point of time (calendar)?
Spring is a season that dictates the lifecycles in all of nature. Last year it came in early May to our neighborhood, whereas this year it could come next week.

Our manmade calendar says Spring should come on March 21/22 and the salesmen need to have enough 1st Qtr sales to pay the taxes by April 15...
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #5  
Old 03-09-2012, 12:09 PM
RigglePLC's Avatar
RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Grand Rapids MI
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I am not in tall fescue country. I heave heard that tall fescue should not be fertilized after warm weather because such feeding stimulates rapid spread of brown patch disease.
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  #6  
Old 03-17-2012, 11:22 AM
MisterBreeze MisterBreeze is online now
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Union County, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ijustwantausername View Post
I have tinkered with my own yard many times and fertilized after that and it did just fine.
Good question, I see NC State say dont fertilize after 3/15. So what do you do about 2 applications of Pre-m?
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  #7  
Old 03-17-2012, 03:28 PM
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grassyfras grassyfras is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
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I'm new so take that in mind. All my vendors seem to recommend N after March 15 for around here. I'm wondering if potassium helps the disease problem?
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