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  #21  
Old 03-05-2012, 12:03 AM
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LindblomRJ LindblomRJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roachy View Post
Thanks for the responses. Im pretty sure no one here is going to calulate water flow mathematically here. Technically I could attempt to calculate the inflow of water over the backyard in a minute, and make sure my drainage could support that rate in outflow per minute but that does not need to be done for this scale. And yes I will make sure my pipe is large enough to support enough outflow of water.

My questions are what professional advice and suggestions would you guys give to help in this situation. How would you guys go about doing this. Yes I am a professional, but I deal mostly in maintenance and do not have the most experience in drainage or excavating.

My plans so far are to install a french drainage sytem along the back fence. Probably dig 12-18in down. Use gravel, fabric, piping etc. Route the water underneath the fence so it is not dammed up thus allowing it to flow outside to the underground drainage. Sound good?
There is a time and a place for a french drain. I am of the opinion that this isn't the best fix for this area. There are others who disagree with me, that is fine.

Here is my thought looking at the pictures and looking at the problem, it isn't a slope issue, it is fence and a mulch issue.

Beyond the fence there is evidently french drain system in place. So the drainage was apparently don't correctly before you were called to the site. The problem happens with the mulch is carried to the fence and plugs up the outlet. The idea of clearing the path of the mulch and adding fabric under river rock to create a dry stream effect. There is already rock back there, so the dry stream bed will not look out of place and will fit in really nicely.

The advantages, you are using the surface to your advantage, it is already there. Next you dig up a yard and drop a franch drain which is well and good, but you have to dump the water out somewhere. I am guessing that will lead an outlet lower than drains on the other side of the fence. That is creating more work and headache for you.
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  #22  
Old 03-05-2012, 07:42 AM
Procut lawn expert Procut lawn expert is offline
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thats what i would do you will not have to worry about it anymore if you do the french drain 18 inches put drain rock about 3 inches from the top of the ground then put river rock or those rock they already have. i would go bye lowes or if you have a john deere landscapes they have the pipe that is a french drain pre made all you do is dig it out put the pipe in then put you rock down i would just fill the rest up with drain rock because it is cheaper then put your landscape rock over it to make it look good.. i have put in 346 french drains and i give a two year guarantee on it that if they have any trouble i will come back and fix it and i have not been back in 10 years to fix one yet .
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  #23  
Old 03-05-2012, 08:13 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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The impression I got from those pictures, is that the paver pathway is the low spot and as water builds up, the ground saturates...
Because there are probably puddles between the mulch and the river stone, could be the reason for the dirt marks on the stone pile... That river stone should be lower than the pavers and it should collect the majority of the water from the impermeable surfaces...

You didn't mention dogs before... the dogs are moving the mulch and the rain is just moving the dirt, for the most part...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #24  
Old 03-05-2012, 12:31 PM
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White Gardens White Gardens is offline
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Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
The impression I got from those pictures, is that the paver pathway is the low spot and as water builds up, the ground saturates...
Because there are probably puddles between the mulch and the river stone, could be the reason for the dirt marks on the stone pile... That river stone should be lower than the pavers and it should collect the majority of the water from the impermeable surfaces...

You didn't mention dogs before... the dogs are moving the mulch and the rain is just moving the dirt, for the most part...
Exactly.

The grade of the beds is too high in relation to the sidewalk.

Either drop the grades of the beds, or do some sort or restraint along the sidewalk. Personally I would drop the grade of the beds as I don't like the look of raised edging along the pavers.

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  #25  
Old 03-05-2012, 05:04 PM
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tyler_mott85 tyler_mott85 is offline
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Originally Posted by 3rdDayBrad View Post
All great suggestions/solutions, guys. May I suggest creating a dry riverbed in the area where the water is draining to? Since the water is already going there, why fight it? Just put in a riverbed, and when it rains, the water will just flow over the rocks and on to wherever it is already heading. Good luck with your project!

This is my immediate idea for this problem. Since there is a drain on the other side of the fence as the OP stated I would just open up a way for the river to run. Make sure as others have said that the finished grade of the river bed is lower than the pathway. This isn't the level of the ground before the rock this is the level of the river bed when all is said is done. After pictures would be just swell.
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  #26  
Old 03-05-2012, 05:56 PM
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White Gardens White Gardens is offline
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Only other suggestion I have is to add a lot more plantings in their to help hold the soil.

The biggest problem is that paver path seems like it was installed too low in relation to the fence also.

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