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  #1  
Old 03-07-2012, 12:56 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is online now
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Granular fert on centipede

I do an all granular program and just switch dealers due to prices. For those who do all granular fert on centipede. What brands and anylasis are you using. It's hard to find granular with little N from chloride.

I was using Sol-U-Cal pear 4-0-6 with iron at .5 lbs per 1000. Hoping to find some other products to replace it.

Hoping Greeddoc and almond will chime in again.
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:40 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is online now
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Patrick: The big culprit is NOT necessarily the Nitrogen (Ammonium Sulfate 21-0-0) which is important but more so the potassium source usually Muriate of Potash contain so much chlorine. I know of no granular with these correct sources. Lesco has a sulfate of potash blend of 19-2-19. You'll have to pull that up and just read. You might also consider blending your own using a small cement mixer.
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:12 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Urea is also a problem. It has 46% nitrogen and no sulfur. Through years of observation, I have noticed the benefits of applying ammonium sulfate rather than urea. I do not get the problems described from fertilizing centipede. By the time you have to roll together 21-0-0 and potassium sulfate in a cement mixer, then re bag it, then put it in a spreader, dropping bags into a tank and spraying it out looks rather attractive to me. I can also add chelated iron and manganese to the liquid as well. Centipede that looks bad is often growing on soils that are alkaline or just do not have enough available micronutrients. Trying to broadcast granular micronutrients is a hard and expensive way to do it. It takes many pounds per acre and if you overshoot or the soil conditions make the application more available than you expected, it is hard to go back.
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Old 03-07-2012, 03:26 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is online now
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Thanks guys. we have exchanged PM's many times. I may have to switch over to a liquid app. I only fertilize 3 times a year on my current program, due to city economics. The first 2 apps were the sol u cal 4-0-6 (ammonium sulfate and sulfate of potash, 5% mg, 11.2% S, and 5% fe). The last is a 8-8-24 or similar at the end of the season.

Would that be enough fertilizer on a liquid program? Could you use the same mix on bermuda, zoysia, and st aug at 3 applications a year? If either of you would mind pm me what you use? Liquid apps are foreign to me and mixing it with my herbicide rounds would save some labor.
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Old 03-07-2012, 03:39 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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The base ingredients do not change among the warm season grasses. You do get to adjust rates/ratios of N and K. Which is the beauty of liquid applications. It is a prescription feeding for each type of grass in its growing conditions. Centipede is light on the N, no phosphorus and high on the K and micronutrients. St Augustine and zoysia can have more N, some P and K. The tank you use for bermuda should be high in N. I use liquids because I do not believe in one size fits all applications.
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Old 03-07-2012, 03:52 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is online now
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By keeping careful records and starting with your centipede lawns (lower in N), any left over product can be upwardly adjusted for St. Augustine or Bermuda. As doctor said, the growing habits and soil conditions are different and have to be adjusted; these are done easily with liquids, sometimes difficult with granular products. Putting it down accurately and not haphazardly with the booms looks so much more professional than running through lawns.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:10 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Using a boom and overlapping the swaths properly makes it hard to stripe or swirl a lawn with a fertilizer misapplication. I did mention the "green dalmatian" look caused when people mean well and try to apply lower rates of a granule. In my area it seems to be hard to get granules to do what they are supposed to do. Someone either gets a lawn that is green, but grows too much, the green dalmatian or a lawn that does nothing. Applying to a lawn is just like painting. You want even swaths put down. The times I have made someone's lawn look strange from a liquid application were from trying to spray when it was too windy and the pattern got distorted.
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  #8  
Old 09-27-2013, 07:34 PM
AllBrad AllBrad is offline
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  #9  
Old 09-27-2013, 09:27 PM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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I fought this problem for a long time, finding a suitable granualar fert for centipede. The only blends I could find suitable were greens grade and economically unfeasable. There were blends out there but no one was willing to order them for me.

And then I talked to my Ewing dealer who I have dealt with mainly in irrigation but they were wanting to expand into the fert/chem market. He talked to a fert producer and custom blended me an order to my specs at a reasonable price. So you might check with your Ewing dealer. The response may depend on the willingness of the local manager but they can do it if they really want to.
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  #10  
Old 09-29-2013, 08:17 AM
bug-guy bug-guy is offline
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on lawns that require less N I usually recommend an ornamental fert like 8-4-10 and try to get 6000-7000 per bag

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