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  #1  
Old 04-08-2012, 02:34 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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One big thing you learned in Horticulture

I wonder what the one big thing you learned in Horticulture. I recall that dirt is something swept under the rug.
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  #2  
Old 04-08-2012, 04:30 PM
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Plant material weather it be trees , shrubs or turf can all be trained to grow a certain way, much like the customers we provide goods and services for. The key is to not have the roles reversed since if that happens you are no longer working for yourself. The customer is a source of income for you and your business. Remember the roles and play the parts.
easy-lift guy
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  #3  
Old 04-08-2012, 05:09 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Originally Posted by easy-lift guy View Post
Plant material weather it be trees , shrubs or turf can all be trained to grow a certain way, much like the customers we provide goods and services for. The key is to not have the roles reversed since if that happens you are no longer working for yourself. The customer is a source of income for you and your business. Remember the roles and play the parts.
easy-lift guy
You want me to squirt and fert my clients ? .


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  #4  
Old 04-08-2012, 05:16 PM
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You want me to squirt and fert my clients ? .


That will cost more and you have to be clear and up front about that from the beginning!
easy-lift guy
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  #5  
Old 04-08-2012, 08:32 PM
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weeze weeze is offline
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i never took a horticulture class.
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  #6  
Old 04-09-2012, 09:19 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Hort class was everything from the lab, to the field... from fungi to angiosperms...

Probably the most significant information I gained,, was the understanding of how every form of plantlife was designed to fit into every bit of the environment , according to it niche...
Once you knew how it fit in, then you could help it to , not Only fit in, but to Thrive...
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  #7  
Old 04-09-2012, 03:56 PM
TooMuchClay TooMuchClay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easy-lift guy View Post
Plant material weather it be trees , shrubs or turf can all be trained to grow a certain way, much like the customers we provide goods and services for. The key is to not have the roles reversed since if that happens you are no longer working for yourself. The customer is a source of income for you and your business. Remember the roles and play the parts.
easy-lift guy

I agree to some extent, as you cant allow your customers(or anyone else) walk all over you and push you around. You also cant go too far with the whole "customer's always right" ideal. If they think thy can take advantage of you, some will. If you are too nice, and not firm to some degree, some clients will try to get you to undercut yourself in price, or do more work than you initially contracted to do, but for the same price. Not everyone is like that, but if you show some weakness, people will play on it. Thats not just true of the customer-contractor relationship, it's true in all areas of life.

But you do have to be "flexible" and willing to compromise, especially in a tough market like we have now. Excessive pride can cost you customers.

Before I started out on my own, I'd worked for a company where the owner, who never personally had to come in contact with the clients, insisted that we just bow down and do whatever the customer wanted. There was no such thing as cancelling a customer's contract and refusing to work for them, no matter how unreasonable or out of control they were!

So when I started on my own, I'd had enough of that nonsense, and I decided I wasnt going to take any BS from any customers, and I was too quick to snap and cancel people for insignificant things, instead of cooling off and thinking it through. That hurt me a bit.

So now, I will tolerate some BS, and do some things I dont want to do, but I have a breaking point, and I wont allow customers to try and get over on me.

You do sometimes have to step back and be willing to compromise at least a little.

Moral of story: The customer is occasionally sometimes always right!
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  #8  
Old 04-09-2012, 08:05 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Originally Posted by TooMuchClay View Post
I agree to some extent, as you cant allow your customers(or anyone else) walk all over you and push you around. You also cant go too far with the whole "customer's always right" ideal. If they think thy can take advantage of you, some will. If you are too nice, and not firm to some degree, some clients will try to get you to undercut yourself in price, or do more work than you initially contracted to do, but for the same price. Not everyone is like that, but if you show some weakness, people will play on it. Thats not just true of the customer-contractor relationship, it's true in all areas of life.

But you do have to be "flexible" and willing to compromise, especially in a tough market like we have now. Excessive pride can cost you customers.

Before I started out on my own, I'd worked for a company where the owner, who never personally had to come in contact with the clients, insisted that we just bow down and do whatever the customer wanted. There was no such thing as cancelling a customer's contract and refusing to work for them, no matter how unreasonable or out of control they were!

So when I started on my own, I'd had enough of that nonsense, and I decided I wasnt going to take any BS from any customers, and I was too quick to snap and cancel people for insignificant things, instead of cooling off and thinking it through. That hurt me a bit.

So now, I will tolerate some BS, and do some things I dont want to do, but I have a breaking point, and I wont allow customers to try and get over on me.

You do sometimes have to step back and be willing to compromise at least a little.

Moral of story: The customer is occasionally sometimes always right!
Out of that I learned BS is good for plants but causes weeds. Horse Manure is much better, has less weeds.
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  #9  
Old 04-10-2012, 08:07 PM
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LawnoftheMonth LawnoftheMonth is offline
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Assassin bugs are a sign of a aphid and/or scale problem.
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  #10  
Old 04-10-2012, 08:19 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Assassin bugs are a sign of a aphid and/or scale problem.
Have not heard that one but I know fire ants will farm Aphids like cattle.

Thank you
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