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  #1  
Old 03-22-2012, 04:12 PM
mcharlto88 mcharlto88 is offline
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19-0-6 .15 Dimension and Edgeguard Spreader Settings

I recently purchased a Sotts Edguard Mini Rotary spreader and a bag of Lesco 19-0-6 .15 Dimension fertilizer. I've looked all over the internet to try and find a spreader setting to use this fertilizer in my spreader and am unable to find anything. Can somebody help me out with which setting I would use to put the proper amount down? Thanks in advance for any help!
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:32 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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So sorry Mcharles, it is a guessing game at best.
Try this chart from Greenview.
http://www.lebsea.com/forms/SpreaderSettingSearch.aspx Use one of their fertilizers that is at 19 percent nitrogen.
Scotts does not want to encourage people to use Lesco fertilizer. So you will get a better chart from Scotts for Scotts products. Walking speed and width of spread are so variable it can be tricky to get it right. May I suggest you try to apply it at half strength, and go over it twice. Adjust the opening for the second pass to come out even. Better to do it twice than to run out half-way finished, and give parts of your lawn a double dose.
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Old 03-23-2012, 03:38 PM
ZeroSignal ZeroSignal is offline
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I did my application yesterday with a scotts edge guard spreader. I found a cross reference somewhere last year but dont rember where. I went with 6.5 seemed to be a good application rate.
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Old 03-27-2012, 01:27 PM
wrooster wrooster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroSignal View Post
I did my application yesterday with a scotts edge guard spreader. I found a cross reference somewhere last year but dont rember where. I went with 6.5 seemed to be a good application rate.
This is consistent with my recent experience with the same spreader and same fertilizer. I used a spreader setting of 3.5 and "cross-hatched" the area, for a total application rate equivalent to a setting of 7.

Wrooster
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:09 AM
mcharlto88 mcharlto88 is offline
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I've already applied this once with a setting of 3.5, but that was a couple weeks ago. Would it be ok to go back now and put down another application using the same setting to get up to the 7? I live in Iowa and it says to put down 1.9lbs/1000sq/ft. I mapped out a 10'x100' spot in my lawn and put down approx. 2lbs on the 3.5 setting. Would it be bad to apply more than two pounds, or would that be ok?
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:23 PM
wrooster wrooster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcharlto88 View Post
I've already applied this once with a setting of 3.5, but that was a couple weeks ago. Would it be ok to go back now and put down another application using the same setting to get up to the 7? I live in Iowa and it says to put down 1.9lbs/1000sq/ft. I mapped out a 10'x100' spot in my lawn and put down approx. 2lbs on the 3.5 setting. Would it be bad to apply more than two pounds, or would that be ok?
If you have measured the actual application rate, and it is consistent with the recommended application rate, then you have the correct spreader setting.

As for it being "bad" to apply more than the recommended application rate, that is dependent on about 87 variables -- all of which will impact the outcome. If your turfgrass is nitrogen-starved, if your soil is too alkaline, if it does not rain, etc etc etc and other factors will come into play. In any case I would not make a second application of N within two weeks of the first, nor would I wait and then make a second application of N right on the cusp of the hot days of summer -- these are sure routes to some type of turfgrass distress.

Wrooster
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:15 PM
mcharlto88 mcharlto88 is offline
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Ok thanks for the information. Can you tell me how I can tell if my lawn is nitrogen starved or not? I've heard of soil testing before, but not sure how to do it, who to have do it, where to take my samples, etc. etc. etc.

When I got my Lesco fert. I went to JDL and the guy gave me a 5 step schedule to follow. I've read from other guys on this site that putting down nitrogen during the summer isn't real great, so I'm curious if the fertilizer I'd put down in the summer months has N or not? The stuff I got for this spring is 19-0-6, but I've seen others put that they have 19-0-0 or something along those lines. I would assume this is based off of what part of the country you live in and what not?
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:39 PM
wrooster wrooster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcharlto88 View Post
I've heard of soil testing before, but not sure how to do it, who to have do it, where to take my samples, etc. etc. etc.
Example here;
http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?p=4334030
See
http://njaes.rutgers.edu/soiltestinglab/
and
http://njaes.rutgers.edu/soiltestinglab/howto.asp
and
http://njaes.rutgers.edu/soiltestinglab/services.asp
and
http://njaes.rutgers.edu/soiltestinglab/results.asp

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcharlto88 View Post
the guy gave me a 5 step schedule to follow.
For now, follow the 5 step plan. You will not break anything. Always remember the ER doctor's mantra: "First, do no harm". While you are busy following the 5 step plan, you can read up on NPK and fertilizer in general and over time learn how to manage your turfgrass more efficiently/selectively.

There is NOTHING anyone can write in a few paragraphs that is going to make you into an instant turfgrass management expert. Think about something you are really good at -- perhaps tennis, for example. Now explain to a layperson in three paragraphs everything they will need to do in order to be an expert at tennis and compete effectively with a tennis pro.

Wrooster
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Old 04-03-2012, 04:15 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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If the label called for 1.9 pounds per 1000 sqft and you applied 2 pounds per thousand with a setting of 3.5--then you are fine.

Nevertheless, if you want to apply more--the label allows this if your lawn had crabgrass last year, or was not treated last year, or it it is (in your opinion "low-cut"). I would wait at least 4 weeks so that the risk is low, and so that the crabgrass control will last until late summer when crabgrass pressure is the most intense.
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Old 04-03-2012, 05:53 PM
mcharlto88 mcharlto88 is offline
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Wrooster, where did you get your soil testing done? I did a quick search in Iowa(where Im from) and didn't have a lot of luck with finding anywhere that I immediately recognize as a place to do soil testing. Wondering what you looked for when searching? Being from Iowa, I found quite a few places that will do field testing for row crops, but wasn't sure if they would do the same for lawn testing.
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