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Old 05-28-2015, 09:45 PM
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jad004 jad004 is offline
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Urea and temperature

At what temp would you not spray urea on Bermuda grass and spread granular urea only.

We have always used granular, but this year, with all of the rainy weather getting us behind, I started putting the urea in with the chemical mix to speed things up (Time wise). Temps are rising now(finally) and I really don't want to burn the leaves by spraying with temp too hot.
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Old 05-28-2015, 10:37 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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How many gallons per thousand sqft of water solution? Around here we use about 3 gals per thousand sqft or more.

Around here the usual rule is to cut the rate to about a half-pound of nitrogen per thousand sqft, if the temperature exceeds 85 degrees. Cut that in half if over 90.

This probably requires a bit of experimentation on your own yard. Walk half as fast--see what happens.
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:15 PM
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jad004 jad004 is offline
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Been putting down 2 gallons per K. and 1/2 pound of nitrogen per K.
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:16 PM
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jad004 jad004 is offline
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It's been between 78-83 degrees here so far. Today hit 86*.
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Old 05-29-2015, 03:36 PM
woodlawnservice woodlawnservice is offline
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Ever sprayed it at low volumes lower than 2g per k
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Old 05-29-2015, 10:33 PM
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At low volumes of water you must add more fertilizer per gallon, the solution becomes much more concentrated. A concentrated solution tends to draw water from a less concentrated moisture area--like the roots--or the leaves. The result can be fertilizer burn. Very brown. More likely at high temperatures.
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