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Old 03-29-2012, 10:13 AM
Mr BC Mr BC is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Eastern NC
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Centipede info

Hi. I have a centipede lawn in Eastern NC in the Rocky Mount area. I'd appreciate advice on aerating and de-thatching. Are these processes safe for this grass since its a very interconnected grass? I think I saw something about specific spacing of thatching rakes for centipede, as in, wider rather than narrow spacing. Which kind of aerator would be better, spike or core? I get the impression that a core aerator is better.

I'm pretty new at this and I feel like I'm starting to get a handle on the fertilizer and herbicide end of it. My biggest concern right now would be areas that I believe have root rot. THey are areas in the lawn which are prone to standing water following heavy rain (like Hurricane Irene, and summer storms), and with the building of my shed, and a tree line along the back property line, there is often shade for most all of the day. Right now it's a clover-type weed and some moss with spotty areas of grass.

I was wondering if I should plant/sprig/sod a small area of grass which tolerates the conditions back there. Its probably a 150-200 sqft area.

There are also some areas that have fairy ring I think. I know it is a common disease for this grass, and the pattern is a ring of dead/injured grass. Its actually a half circular area. Anyone know how I can address that?

Thanks for any advice...

BC
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:46 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is online now
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DO NOT AERATE, OR USE A THATCHING MACHINE!!!! Centipede spreads by stolon growth moving across the soil surface. To do these things will pull up growth. Just use a bagger on the grass when you mow. Let it grow...a good stand of centipede could (said quietly) and again COULD go three weeks without mowing. It does not like traffic. It does not like too much Nitrogen. What you are seeing is probably a fungus and without photo, just guessing. It does like full sun. Put some St. Augustine in those shady spots. Too many things that should be done in a well managed IPM program. A good choice of ideas is to let a GOOD Experienced Person fertilize it for a summer. Someone that knows the grass and has the proper equipment to treat fungus and fertilize it properly. Exactly where in NC are you located?
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Old 03-29-2012, 05:07 PM
Mr BC Mr BC is offline
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Location: Eastern NC
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I'm in the Nashville / Rocky Mount area. I've used Lesco 10-0-20 fertilizer before. It was recommended by the Lesco people and a couple others who have experience with this grass. I put it out for the last 2 seasons and it seemed to work really well. After the heat killed off the spring weeds I spot treated dandelions and other broadleafs with Celsius to good results. It killed the weeds and didn't touch the grass. Not to argue, but I have heard that aerating could be bad and also have read it is acceptable in centipede. Kinda confusing.

I'd have to check on the soil type for sure but it's not a sandy soil, there is a clay component to it and it's fairly compact. My wife tells stories of how hard her dad worked to plant sprigs when the house was built, and when I built my shed and dug the strips to lay the blocks for the foundation skids I worked my arse off. I planned to dig the whole area, and pour a slab but changed my tactic after the first attempt at getting a shovel in the ground ( found out after the fact about sod cutters).

Today I looked in the back and saw that the 'mossy' area it does get full sun but for only about 4 hours I'd guess. It was nice and sunny at 2pm. I'm guessing from about 11am to 3pm. That area and a couple other small areas seem to show root rot. I noticed it after Hurricane Irene last year and after things dried out I checked some browning areas and could pull on the grass and the web of stolons pulled away from the ground and compacted soil (like had been saturated and dried) with no connection into the soil. I had also tried to top dress the area above my septic tank cover (with the thought I might do the same for the rotted areas) with some soil from Lowes, but it didn't work too well. I got some growth but I think it was the wrong stuff.

Thanks for the reply, RAlmaroad.
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Old 03-29-2012, 06:23 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is online now
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Give this a try...you may have to order it. http://www.lesco.johndeerelandscapes...&ID=10905&.pdf
Use 4lb of this product/1000 sq. ft. This will give you a 1/2lb/K rate.
I'm over the mountains in East TN.
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