Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-22-2012, 07:25 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: nc
Posts: 3,176
soil testing labs

Where do you guys send samples? I usually use my local university, NC State. They do a pretty good job, but the turn around is usually 4-6 weeks. I've heard Virginia Tech's is very good especially on testing for Nitrogen.

any info or links would be great.
__________________
GrassMasters, LLC
Wilson, NC
www.grassmasterswilson.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-22-2012, 07:53 PM
NattyLawn NattyLawn is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,648
A&L's turnaround time is 2-4 days and the tests are somewhat customizable.

http://al-labs-eastern.com/
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-22-2012, 08:09 PM
R&S Lawn Care R&S Lawn Care is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Oklahoma Ctiy, OK
Posts: 294
Oklahoma State U. 7-10 days. $10. For npk and ph and recommendations.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-22-2012, 08:09 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,294
I second A&L labs. Comprehensive tests at a good price and fast turnaround time. Going through the extension service is a joke. 2 weeks and only NPK and pH. If I wanted micronutrients, that would be $10 per element and my turnaround time might be months.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-23-2012, 10:09 AM
R&S Lawn Care R&S Lawn Care is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Oklahoma Ctiy, OK
Posts: 294
$10. Is well worth it to me, as it gives a good starting point. Had some yards with ph of 4.7-5.2. This was the only way to know what the problem was. I thought the pre's were root pruning. Now i know it was the AL in the soil that was doing damage. Yes, testing for micros can get expensive. After liming these suspect yards are coming around. Guy at OSU said he's had a lot coming in at 4-4.5. Not normally this low.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-23-2012, 11:16 AM
Skipster Skipster is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Billings, MT
Posts: 658
Why do you need a soil test for N? Sounds like some folks don't understand soil chemistry and plant nutrition ....
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-23-2012, 01:50 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,294
The N reading is something I do not pay much attention to. It is the other 10 or so elements that make a difference.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-23-2012, 02:49 PM
GaryCinChicago GaryCinChicago is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago, IL.
Posts: 14
Logan Labs LLC http://www.loganlabs.com/index.html - most comprehensive soil test for $20.

Here's a sample report http://www.loganlabs.com/doc/Soil-Report-Sample.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-23-2012, 05:28 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: nc
Posts: 3,176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
Why do you need a soil test for N? Sounds like some folks don't understand soil chemistry and plant nutrition ....
I wasn't referring to the amount of N needed. Rather that i've heard the extension testing methods aren't very accurate of N and other elements.

Not sure if you know anything about North Carolina soils but our major issue is really only pH. I've never had a soil test that recommended anything other than a generic 15-0-15 fert.

You are correct that I don't understand the lawns needs for micros other than I like to have them with my normal fert apps. People in my area will never pay for a specialty app of Mg, zinc, or iron.
__________________
GrassMasters, LLC
Wilson, NC
www.grassmasterswilson.com
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-23-2012, 07:01 PM
Skipster Skipster is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Billings, MT
Posts: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by grassmasterswilson View Post
I wasn't referring to the amount of N needed. Rather that i've heard the extension testing methods aren't very accurate of N and other elements.

Not sure if you know anything about North Carolina soils but our major issue is really only pH. I've never had a soil test that recommended anything other than a generic 15-0-15 fert.

You are correct that I don't understand the lawns needs for micros other than I like to have them with my normal fert apps. People in my area will never pay for a specialty app of Mg, zinc, or iron.
There are more than a few things that should be set straight about your thoughts on soil testing. First, N is not usually tested because it is a transient element that changes form and presence rather quickly in the soil. Testing it at one point in time doesn't help you make management decisions, since the level has changed from the time you took the sample to the time you analyze the results. I'm VERY familiar with NC soils, which is why I recommend the NC testing lab, not some lab outside of the state.

Secondly, extension service methods are just as reliable as private lab methods. The North Carolina Dept. of Ag (the NCSU extension service lab) uses the exact same method for analysis that A&L Labs, Logan Labs, and CLC Labs uses. The NC Dept of Ag lab is also part of the North American Proficiency Testing Program, which ensures soil test quality among labs. Logan, A&L, and CLC are also a part of this program.

Third, the NC Dept of Ag lab includes HM%, OM by weight, CEC, BCSR, pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, Cu, and S in its test.

And the NC lab is FREE to all NC residents! Its free in the sense that you don't have to pay a fee for the test. The cost of the test is funded by a tax on fertilizer, so if you buy fertilizer, you've already paid for the soil test. May as well use it!

But, don't think that state extension service tests (for any state) are inferior. The private labs usually get their testing methods and knowledge from the state labs.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:56 AM.

Page generated in 0.08104 seconds with 7 queries