Register free!

The Green Industry's Resource Center



Reply
 
Thread Tools   Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-14-2013, 12:36 PM
spitfire3416's Avatar
spitfire3416 spitfire3416 is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Central Jersey
Posts: 384
Lawn needs serious help!

Why do you think this lawn is in such disrepair? It didn't look this bad earlier in the year and I heard that pine needles can be acidic to the soil. Does anyone know if there is any truth to this?

Sorry.. not sure why the pictures came in sideways..
Attached Images
   
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-14-2013, 08:38 PM
jc1 jc1 is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: The Real South Jersey
Posts: 659
Grubs?
Dig around some see if there are grubs just below the surface
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-15-2013, 01:25 AM
herler herler is online now
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,873
Subscribed.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-15-2013, 01:29 AM
Mike A Mike A is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Evansville, in
Posts: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by herler View Post
Subscribed.
Moles, skunks or raccoons after some grub??
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-15-2013, 11:09 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,987
There are signs of grubs being dug up,,, but the rest of the lawn just dried up and withered away... Especially evident in the median strip...
pine needles can leach acid,,, similar to the way coffee grounds do,,, but it is a short-lived change and rotted needles are no more acidic than rotted maple leaves...
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-18-2013, 09:40 PM
JimLewis's Avatar
JimLewis JimLewis is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 6,585
To answer your question, yes, it's difficult to grow a good healthy lawn underneath any tree that drops a lot of needles. First, because it makes the soil too acidic and second because if a tree is that big dropping tons of needles, it's also usually providing a lot of shade to the area, which just compounds the problem. Most varieties of turfgrass really don't thrive in shade. Some tolerate shade better than others. But shade never makes for a better lawn.

That said, it's hard to say from just two photos what's going on there. Just from the photos I would say it's a combination of very poor soil, needles, no sprinkler system, and lack of regular fertilization. But it's so far gone it's hard to tell if there's maybe something else going on in addition to these things. Best to call a good professional landscape installation company and they can advise you best, knowing your local conditions better than most of us here do.
__________________
Jim Lewis
Lewis Landscape Services - Oregon
"kickin' grass and takin' names"


www.lewislandscape.com - Portland Oregon Landscaping Company

landscape design Portland Oregon
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:43 AM.

Page generated in 0.06438 seconds with 10 queries