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Old 05-31-2012, 10:31 AM
burneyr burneyr is offline
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Location: North Florida
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Globe Sedge & other help one year later

Well, last year I came to the board looking for some assistance with my sedge problem, and I'm back again.

My post from last year for some history of the problem: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=350623

I chickened out on applying the chemicals myself, and hired what I thought was a "professional" company. This company has the best reputation in my area, and from the information they provided, were using the same products recommended by the professionals on this board I trust. To make a long story short, their service has been lackluster at best. I have not received nearly the level of services their salesman advised I would receive. I suppose mediocre would best describe the level of service I have received. I could write a huge post detailing all the problems, but I'd just rather forget about it. Some things they did exceptionally well, others were poor. Then, in March of this year, this is what their fancy self-propelled granular spreader did to my centipede lawn.





Needless to say, this was just the last straw for me. I have let their contract expire of course, but I have an additional concern.

Most of my lawn is starved of nutrients where no fertilizer was applied. This being centipede and subject to decline, I am afraid to add any additional nitrogen this year as it may kill or damage the lawn. I do see some limited reddening of the blades in the unfertilized areas which I believe indicates a potassium deficiency. Is there any product available that I can apply that will green the lawn and help with nutrient deficiencies without adding nitrogen? When I complained to the company that did this, they sent out a truck with liquid iron and kind of evened the color out, but that only lasted about a month.

Also, I have had to irrigate far more heavily than usual to keep up with the excess of fertilizer to prevent the lawn from getting burnt. Of course, this exacerbates my globe sedge problem, and it is rampant again.

Is there a professional on the board that might help me with my problem? Maybe "coach" me in caring for my lawn? I have given up on finding a good company to handle my lawn as my choices are very limited in my sparsely-populated town. Since I have used the "best" available here and see what that looks like; I am ready to give this a try myself. In the past year I have really studied up on the label requirements of the Celcius and Certainty products that have been in use on my lawn. I am certain that if I want this lawn done right, I'll have to do it myself. I will say that I am amenable to getting myself set up with whatever equipment is required to do it right, and learn how to apply exactly as required. From using the search function, it appears that customized spray rig Greendoctor built would be the ticket. Since I have near 24,000 sq ft of turf to treat, that would probably be my best bet too.

Again, this is just a call for assistance. I have tried to hire my lawn service out, but it just isn't working due to the poor selection of professionals in my area. If you can help, please shoot me a PM or email through the board. I do appreciate any replies.
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:34 AM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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In the first thread you mentioned sending off a soil test but I seem to have missed the results.
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:49 AM
burneyr burneyr is offline
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I test every year, and the most current soil test performed March of this year stated:

Phosphorus (ppm P) > 196
Potassium (ppm K) 41
Magnesium (ppm Mg) 37
Calcium (ppm Ca) 825

The graph accompanying the tests ranged the following:

Phosphorus = Very high
Potassium = Medium
Magnesium = High

This test was performed before the fertilization, so I am unaware of how the soil nutrients rate at the present time.
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:55 AM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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I am assuming a sandy soil too?
Is there a pH?
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:58 AM
burneyr burneyr is offline
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Relatively sandy, but not exactly loam either.

Sorry about the pH, that was important! 6.8 is the number.
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Old 05-31-2012, 12:10 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burneyr View Post
Relatively sandy, but not exactly loam either.

Sorry about the pH, that was important! 6.8 is the number.
Have we positively identified the weed? Certainty® will control about 8 types and will often require 2 rounds 6 weeks apart.

More important is perhaps getting into the habit of aeration and top dressing with compost for a few years until you can build up the soil a little more. Problem is you would likely need to use 15 yards of good compost per application. That would likely cost you 900 plus the labor to spread or rent a spreader. I know some professional soil places have spreader rentals.

This would not completely replace fertilization but it will improve the moisture holding capacity of the soil and stimulate better roots of the turf.

You may also consider reaching out to your local extension office and talking to a master gardener familar with your area.

PS

Be careful of Chicken Manure Compost, Cotton burr is a better choice in many cases if you can find it in bulk.
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Old 05-31-2012, 12:50 PM
burneyr burneyr is offline
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Most definitely, my local extension office and the applicator ID'ed the sedge as globe sedge.

One of my problems with the PCO is I had asked and negotiated for blanket sedge treatments. When they first arrived they blanket treated with Certainty, and I did not see one single sprig of sedge for five weeks. By the eighth, it was as rampant as before their first application. From that point on, they spot treated and just chased it all over the lawn. I politely asked them if they could blanket treat twice over the season eight weeks apart. That would carry me through the summer and greatly help the appearance of the lawn. I'd rather have had the sedge pretty heavy for a couple weeks at a time rather than have it growing strong here and there all the time over the growing season. However, they did not want to do that despite my understanding with the salesman before money changed hands. Once they had my annual payment, all bets were off.

The lawn is core aerated once annually before the pre-emergent is applied, and composted in areas that need some attention leveling. I have heard since that aerating centipede is questionable since it cuts/damages the stolons where most growth occurs, but I have not discontinued that as yet. As to the moisture holding capacity, I paid for one application of a water retention agent, and I have noticed results from that.

I live in a small rural area, and I wish an outfit had appropriate spreader rentals. I have applied three pallets of compost by this point, and the bulk of that I either broomed or raked into the turf. I have a New Holland tractor, but keep it off my lawn turf due to weight.
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Old 05-31-2012, 02:55 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burneyr View Post
Most definitely, my local extension office and the applicator ID'ed the sedge as globe sedge.

One of my problems with the PCO is I had asked and negotiated for blanket sedge treatments. When they first arrived they blanket treated with Certainty, and I did not see one single sprig of sedge for five weeks. By the eighth, it was as rampant as before their first application. From that point on, they spot treated and just chased it all over the lawn. I politely asked them if they could blanket treat twice over the season eight weeks apart. That would carry me through the summer and greatly help the appearance of the lawn. I'd rather have had the sedge pretty heavy for a couple weeks at a time rather than have it growing strong here and there all the time over the growing season. However, they did not want to do that despite my understanding with the salesman before money changed hands. Once they had my annual payment, all bets were off.

The lawn is core aerated once annually before the pre-emergent is applied, and composted in areas that need some attention leveling. I have heard since that aerating centipede is questionable since it cuts/damages the stolons where most growth occurs, but I have not discontinued that as yet. As to the moisture holding capacity, I paid for one application of a water retention agent, and I have noticed results from that.

I live in a small rural area, and I wish an outfit had appropriate spreader rentals. I have applied three pallets of compost by this point, and the bulk of that I either broomed or raked into the turf. I have a New Holland tractor, but keep it off my lawn turf due to weight.
3 pallets is likely about 1 yard.

Sedges are often the result of poor soil, poor drainage and or over watering.
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