Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 07-01-2012, 07:14 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,387
This is also cool season grass which will shut down if it is over 80. Not managing temperature on those grasses means a reseeding.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-01-2012, 07:59 PM
R&S Lawn Care R&S Lawn Care is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Oklahoma Ctiy, OK
Posts: 294
Learned something new again. Never really considered the cooling effect on soil and grass itself. Just giving the grass and soil drink has multiple benefits. Of course being in Oklahoma im fairly new to cool season grasses.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:04 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,387
Place yourself in the grass's shoes. It is over 80. You are not in an AC building or truck. Now doesn't a pool, fountain, sprinklers, or a hose sound good. Don't answer if you are actually the wicked witch of the West.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:06 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 7,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Place yourself in the grass's shoes. It is over 80. You are not in an AC building or truck. Now doesn't a pool, fountain, sprinklers, or a hose sound good. Don't answer if you are actually the wicked witch of the West.
Bermuda moves in
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:10 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,387
I frequently have to answer how to kill bermuda in other grasses. That is the sign that you are not managing irrigation right for that kind of grass. Bermuda takes a beating if it is too wet or it rains too much.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:14 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 7,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
I frequently have to answer how to kill bermuda in other grasses. That is the sign that you are not managing irrigation right for that kind of grass. Bermuda takes a beating if it is too wet or it rains too much.
Rumor has it, Ric can rid a SA lawn of Bermuda. You have to try hard to over water Bermuda around here.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:16 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,387
Conversly, it moves in because the lawn is kept too dry or temperature management is not kept in mind. I can see it invading a cool season lawn allowed to bake or an SA lawn on an irrigation ban/restriction.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:24 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
I am from Michigan. My irrigation runs lightly every day. And most irrigation companies will set up new systems this way. Grass does not think. Roots do not grow towards water, like we reach for a cold beer. My professor friend says that necrotic ring spot damage is much reduced by light daily irrigation. "Grass does not turn brown at night. Water during the hot part of the day. Use about 1/10 of an inch. Grass has maximum transpiration during the heat of the day. This is when the roots cannot keep up because they cannot pull enough water out of the soil fast enough to satisfy the transpiration demand."
This is beyond an enormous waste of water. There is absolutely no reason or need to practice syringing on resi/comm turf, with the possible except of turf in pure sand ..... which then begs the question WHY! If someone is planting turf on pure sand in a resi/comm scenario, then they need several swift kicks in the head.

How is it I can maintain relatively disease free fescue in an area with no rain, average summer temps in the mid to upper 90's, with 3-5 day irrigation intervals? The reason your grass can't keep up Riggle is quite likely because you are restricting the rooting depth and density with your daily light watering.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
Who is willing to dig up their grass to see how deep the roots are growing on the individual plots?
Unless you have the ability to core to 2+ feet, this is pointless. Plus, rooting depths can be highly variable from site to site, or even on the same site. That said, some of the fescue I manage has root zones that extend well past 12".

Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
This is not easy. The top baseball groundskeepers are the experts. They have a critical eye for this. They can tell by looking if the grass needs water, but they want the soil firm for good ball bounce and playability. Greenskeepers just the same.
Resi/comm turf is not sports turf, and it should not be manged like sports turf.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-01-2012, 08:27 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 7,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
This is beyond an enormous waste of water. There is absolutely no reason or need to practice syringing on resi/comm turf, with the possible except of turf in pure sand ..... which then begs the question WHY! If someone is planting turf on pure sand in a resi/comm scenario, then they need several swift kicks in the head.

How is it I can maintain relatively disease free fescue in an area with no rain, average summer temps in the mid to upper 90's, with 3-5 day irrigation intervals? The reason your grass can't keep up Riggle is quite likely because you are restricting the rooting depth and density with your daily light watering.



Unless you have the ability to core to 2+ feet, this is pointless. Plus, rooting depths can be highly variable from site to site, or even on the same site. That said, some of the fescue I manage has root zones that extend well past 12".



Resi/comm turf is not sports turf, and it should not be manged like sports turf.
Party is over
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:45 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central Wisconsin
Posts: 9,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
... We need some experiments guys--who is willing to conduct a side by side comparison?

Who is willing to dig up their grass to see how deep the roots are growing on the individual plots?

And we cannot forget about the soil type, percolation and aeration--roots need air. Sandy soil, fine, (but may drain too fast). Clay soil may be oxygen deficient or experience carbon dioxide at toxic levels in the deeper layers.

Low humidity and wind increase transpiration. ...
Field tests are the only way to prove/disprove the validity of a theory/myth, which has been held for a period of time...
Clay Loams are the ones that have the water problems, while sand is obvious in it water supply...
The heavy topsoil placed on top of sandy hills, tend to dry from underneath, from what I can tell... the problem has always been , getting the water to soak in deep enough to actually reach the point of draining... fact is, that the surface tends to soak up water quickly then begins the runoff and the evaporation pools...
Long soaking rains/irr. events at irregular intervals are rather unrealistic...

We're have low humidity and wind, under burning sun, here is Wisco for most of the month... how's the non-irrigated mature lawns doing over there???
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:34 AM.

Page generated in 0.07246 seconds with 8 queries