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  #101  
Old 07-08-2012, 02:03 PM
turbosl2 turbosl2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
........ Silly boy. Go ahead and compare radius with nozzle output.
Uhh, i dont see the point here. Wet Boots is correct. At 25psi and the same distnace the maxipaw puts out 1.5times more precipitation per hr than my 5000 heads
  #102  
Old 07-08-2012, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Leary View Post
Even if a well was permitted (doubtful), there would be the little issue of a Reduced-Pressure Backflow Assembly needed. In a lot of areas, an RP is also required for a booster pump and any sort of fertilizer injection into the system.
I think you are assuming some connection between the system and the house, which wouldn't be a given with a new well

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
........ Silly boy. Go ahead and compare radius with nozzle output.


If you believe that chart, then get your video camera and run through a demo of the system that you installed that has 5000-series rotor heads running at 25 psi.

In fact, can anyone confirm they did an install with 5000-series rotors running at 25 psi? Or even did a zone expansion with those heads running at 25 psi.

A zone expansion is more likely for low pressure examples. I used the Minipaw and Maxipaw heads in low-pressure neighborhoods, but I never designed with 25 psi head pressures, but I do remember expanding one system's existing zones to cover new areas, and had a number of the Maxipaw (08 nozzle) doing 34 feet or so, at the very lowest head pressures.

And for anyone who wants to point at a chart like it means anything, tell us about the system of Falcon heads you installed, with 30 psi at the heads (or maybe even 40 psi)
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  #103  
Old 07-08-2012, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
I think you are assuming some connection between the system and the house, which wouldn't be a given with a new well
Given the price of water, most smart purveyors will figure you'll hook-up to the house, which is a cross-connection and demands backflow.
  #104  
Old 07-08-2012, 02:51 PM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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Originally Posted by turbosl2 View Post
I will give this a try. I think its a great idea. If i could cut back the zone times it is possible to water more frequently, such as in the AM, then again maybe at dinner time. Right now i dont water at dinner because of all the issues about fungas since the grass would be wet all night. right now at 40mins a zone its a must to break the system into two parts (one day front, the other back). The compost is just way to much work. Noone that i know would even try to do anything with almost 2 acres. I dont turn the sprinklers on until end of may, june 1. The system seems to keep the grass to hold its own while everyone else around here is burnt and dormant, unless they have shade or all weeds, the weeds seem to keep it green.

I will lookup that moisture meter and order it up.

I know it sounded like a good idea to just throw some topsoil down but noone in there right mind will spend that kind of money, you just have to live with what you got. And i think with your idea of the moisture meter it will prob bring me to watering totally different.

How far do grass roots usually penetrate? I was told that every other day long watering per zone would force them to grow deeper in search of water. Whatever that means
BCG can give you a better description but to get roots deep takes hands on testing and the moisture meter will help definitely. Root growth is genetic as well as situational. Roots don't know water is below them. They grow discover water then take advantage of it. To get roots deep requires an extended period of watering just beyond the root zone and let the roots go a tad deeper then water just a little more beyond the root zone etc. The key is to not water until the turf start to get water stress. as you do this over the course of several seasons you will notice it keeps taking longer and longer for the grass to get into water stress. That is a reflection of root growth. It helps as well to let the turf grow longer before mowing. Dig a nice hole in several places, pull up the turf and measure the root length. That will help with how far you push the moisture probe in.

I'm not using laymen terms because you will get sleepyhead if I do. So this is very diluted explaining.

My reasoning for your fertilizing is because with sandy soil your fertilizer washes down pretty quick out of the plants root zone. So if you fertilize three times a year try to apply that fertilizer in the same total amount but do it in smaller portions 10-12 times. A fertilizer injector will apply a small amount of fertilizer every time you water. That would be ideal in my opinion.

If the educated anal want to parse this please feel free to do so.
  #105  
Old 07-08-2012, 04:06 PM
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jvanvliet jvanvliet is offline
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This is a circle jerk; He needs to increase his supply & pipe; he needs to ammend his soil with organic matter; he needs to call a local irrigation company and a landscape company that's familiar with the area.

All the professionals here are idiots with the exception of Kiril; he just comes across as an idiot to fit in.

Does the gerbil still live?
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  #106  
Old 07-08-2012, 04:27 PM
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There are good lawns on uber-sandy soil, but you have to bomb them with water. The OP should look into getting a well. A one-inch mainline can work fine with 12-gpm zones
  #107  
Old 07-08-2012, 04:32 PM
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DanaMac DanaMac is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvanvliet View Post
All the professionals here are idiots
How so? He is not going to get a bigger supply, he is not going to tear up the yard and amend the soil, he is not going to tear out the install and start over. So what else is there? He can make changes that will make the system better, but not perfect, and then live with the areas that are not perfect. The areas that are weak will probably be fine half of the growing season, and be stressed the other half, but not dead. I think we all have told him he needs a better design and/or better supply and pressure.
  #108  
Old 07-08-2012, 04:45 PM
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People drill wells all the time, and it's a no-brainer if you get the money back in water-bill savings.
  #109  
Old 07-08-2012, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
People drill wells all the time, and it's a no-brainer if you get the money back in water-bill savings.
Not around here, the State wants to know how much you're taking, how deep you're going and what you're doing with it. There are restrictions and heavy paperwork is required it pull off a well, especially for irrigation.
  #110  
Old 07-08-2012, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
People drill wells all the time,
Not here they don't. The only homes I have ever seen here, with a separate well, are at least 30-40 years old. And even those wells were usually for the home as well, until they changed over to city water, but left the pump and well for irrigation. The newer areas of town that do have wells, never have a separate well for irrigation. Not sure why, maybe has to do with water rights and laws here. I don't know why and don't want to research it.

Many of the areas here on wells, are still metered. Yes I said that right, some homes with wells are metered. Meaning they are allotted a certain number of gallons per year, and going over they get hit with some serious overage charges. So I am assuming that my response above, is due to water rights issues.
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