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  #21  
Old 07-14-2012, 11:16 AM
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jvanvliet jvanvliet is offline
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It depends on the city here... most of them get it.

It galls me to see the city and county irrigation running daily during periods of water restrictions.
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  #22  
Old 07-14-2012, 03:38 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
We do not get much sympathy for variances. Some of the more advanced cities will work with you only after you have thrown every proven water saving principle to work, ET controls, water audits with high DU, often including things like MSMTR. Those same cities also mandate ET on new residential.

We try to pre-stress the grass and get it used to less water. St A is not going to make it in some cases. Some cities in Texas have Banned ST A.

I like ST A but it is not as drought tolerant as Buffalo, Bermuda, or Zoysia. I am coming around to thinking Zoysia is perhaps the best of all worlds for good turf.
Even the simplest "landscaper" in Hawaii knows not to put SA in a full sun, dry location. Zoysia has become very popular due to its disease resistance, drought resistance and herbicide resistance. You can put a zoysia lawn through things that would kill other grasses. Might not look good and it would take a long time to recover, but it will be back. Only caveat is that it should be maintained with a reel mower. Which might be a problem for people used to using rotary mowers for everything. Grass might be cheaper to maintain in terms of irrigation and chemical needs, but the mowing is a killer.
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  #23  
Old 07-14-2012, 08:10 PM
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Autoflow Autoflow is offline
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I'm with bcg.
I think one of the problems is watering too often long term which makes the roots of turf and gardens stay shallow. If the soil is always wet at the top, the roots will become lazy and stay there because the water is right there all the time.
Water less frequently but deeper and the top of the soil dries out, but deeper down there is moisture. The roots will chase the water deep down and get a deep root system and become much more drought tolerant.

I know some plants require watering more often than others, but most people generally water far too often during Spring and Autumn and it makes the plants struggle in summer because their roots are too shallow and they are the first lawns to turn it up in the extreme heat.
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  #24  
Old 07-14-2012, 08:13 PM
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FIMCO-MEISTER FIMCO-MEISTER is offline
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Bcg gave pretty much the answer I would. I will throw out there with the time restrictions it makes having fewer zones enticing. I can see systems that should be 12 hydro zones having a couple of them merged if they are fairly close in watering needs. Designing around a water window gets tossed into the mix
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  #25  
Old 07-14-2012, 10:52 PM
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grassman177 grassman177 is offline
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i am glad we dont have any with restrictions really, on when they can water etc. but, the larger the system, the more you dont have a choice to water in the night to get thru the cycle. i have thought about doing every day, half one, half the next.
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  #26  
Old 07-18-2012, 12:26 AM
DieselMDX DieselMDX is offline
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so i guess 20 minute a zone with rotors is too short for Mass?
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  #27  
Old 07-18-2012, 12:27 AM
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irritation irritation is offline
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not if it rains.
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  #28  
Old 07-18-2012, 04:22 AM
DieselMDX DieselMDX is offline
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lol we havnt had rain in weeks!
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  #29  
Old 07-18-2012, 06:54 AM
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greenmonster304 greenmonster304 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duekster View Post

We try to pre-stress the grass and get it used to less water. St A is not going to make it in some cases. Some cities in Texas have Banned ST A.
Texas doesn't have anything better to do than tell you what kind of grass to plant?
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  #30  
Old 07-18-2012, 07:11 AM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenmonster304 View Post
Texas doesn't have anything better to do than tell you what kind of grass to plant?
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What part of "some cities" don't you understand?
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