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  #11  
Old 07-22-2012, 10:39 AM
orangemower orangemower is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elitelawnteam1 View Post
we just better have a really snow-laden winter.

that's all i got to say...
and if we don't, there's always Walmart. "Hello, welcome to Walmart, have a wonderful day" LOL "thank you for shopping at Walmart, have a great day" That's all you have to say when people walk in and out of the store.
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  #12  
Old 07-22-2012, 02:35 PM
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DA Quality Lawn & YS DA Quality Lawn & YS is offline
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Agreed we will need a snowy AND cold winter this season. Humans may like it all warm and toasty and comfy but it is detrimental in so many other ways.
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  #13  
Old 07-22-2012, 04:06 PM
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rreyn1812 rreyn1812 is offline
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Forecasts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I don't pay much attention to long range weather forecasting. I have seen a good many droughts start and/or end with little notice from weather forecasters. I found the best thing to do during a drought is not to read or watch on TV, long range forecast. Just too many variables influencing weather patterns that can change everything in an instant.
I try to pay attention to most everything weather related. Long range predicitions are always pretty "iffy" but I try to observe trends. Things can change in an instant, but I try to plan as best I can with as much information as I can collect. I catch all the local and national weather info and they do vary quite a bit, but you can identify some level of uncertainty that may help. We're so bad right now, that it will take a major event, or a whole lot of smaller events to make a dent in this situation.
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  #14  
Old 07-22-2012, 04:39 PM
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zechstoker zechstoker is offline
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Found this to be rather interesting in regards to our current drought situation.

http://www.weather.com/weather/video...den-city-29746
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  #15  
Old 07-22-2012, 05:03 PM
205mx 205mx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herler View Post
That can still happen, contrary to popular belief flooding is not the opposite of a drought, rather in more than a few cases the two work together to where you can have a drought stricken area that gets flooded on a regular basis, doesn't make sense some people say... But the drought we are suffering from isn't just from lack of rain, it's because when it does rain it comes down fast and furious so there's no time for it to seep into the ground but rather most of it washes away...

When that happens trees and plants with deep root systems can't get any water so the plant adapts by allowing its roots to grow closer to the surface of the earth, unfortunately this also compromises plant stability so when a strong wind comes along it is very possible for shallow-rooted plants to simply uproot and fall over.

That is how desertification happens, slowly, over a number of years lush areas can turn to dirt as plant life disappears.

When over many years the rainfall is sporadic and when it does rain it comes down hard and fast, to make matters worse the erosion is amplified when we no longer have trees and plants to stop the water from running amuck, plant life normally slows erosion caused by run-off considerably...
Deserts in most cases are not made of sand, some people think it is but only a few of the world's deserts consist of sand as we know it.
Most deserts actually consist of good topsoil but erosion has so destroyed the landscape that little has a chance to take hold, meanwhile it gets very hot during the day and very cold during the night because dirt has little insulative quality, we as humans have ignored the problem for many years.

These deserts spread, every year more of the earth is turned into areas where nothing will grow and it is becoming difficult to ignore.
It started in Australia and Africa, now big parts of Asia are into it and most of northern Africa is all desert.
Today, America as a continent (both north and south) are starting to see it as well.
Currently about half the world is suffering from drought and flooding.

Now...
Flooding is what happens when several water run-offs converge in one area where it simply can not run off fast enough, when it runs off so fast that at some point it bottlenecks, that's all flooding is, some might say improper drainage but it's also a by-product of desertification...

Not sure if that helped lol

do me a favor. take a glass of water, put some ice in it and mark the height, then let it sit, when the ice melts, check the mark. Water, takes up the same space whether in solid (ICE) form, or liquid form. this is in response to your response about the ice caps melting. LOL> interesting.
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  #16  
Old 07-22-2012, 05:38 PM
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zechstoker zechstoker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 205mx View Post
do me a favor. take a glass of water, put some ice in it and mark the height, then let it sit, when the ice melts, check the mark. Water, takes up the same space whether in solid (ICE) form, or liquid form. this is in response to your response about the ice caps melting. LOL> interesting.
I hope that analogy was meant to be a joke. This is more along the lines of what he's talking about. When these "ice caps" or glaciers melt (see link below), water levels rise since this mass of ice is ABOVE the surface of the body of water.

http://www.willgoto.com/images/Size3...35c091c85c.jpg
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  #17  
Old 07-22-2012, 06:05 PM
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zechstoker zechstoker is offline
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Now that I re-read all of the above, I think my last comment was a bit off topic. I'd delete it I could, but since I can't... disregard that.
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  #18  
Old 07-22-2012, 07:16 PM
205mx 205mx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zechstoker View Post
I hope that analogy was meant to be a joke. This is more along the lines of what he's talking about. When these "ice caps" or glaciers melt (see link below), water levels rise since this mass of ice is ABOVE the surface of the body of water.

http://www.willgoto.com/images/Size3...35c091c85c.jpg


oh... my.... goodness.

why would Ice, that is floating on the top of the water, cause the water level to rise if melted??? ever heard of density? how does that have any meaning?

now, for the ice that isnt floating:

90% of the ENTIRE WORLD's ice is in Antarctica. (ice covered land mass)

If ALL of the ice in Antarctica melted, sea levels around the world would rise about 200 feet.

But the average temperature in Antarctica is -37C. Most parts of the entire continent never get above freezing.

thats the south pole, at the north pole, the ice floats on the Atlantic ocean, so the the sea levels are not affected.
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  #19  
Old 07-23-2012, 09:51 AM
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MOturkey MOturkey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orangemower View Post
and if we don't, there's always Walmart. "Hello, welcome to Walmart, have a wonderful day" LOL "thank you for shopping at Walmart, have a great day" That's all you have to say when people walk in and out of the store.
Sorry, man, but our local Walmart has done away with greeters. They did so a couple of months ago. Now you have to duck under the storm curtains and get your own cart. What is funny is, I saw a guy go out the door one day, and the "Walmart security system activated." You know, the scanner that reads the chips in more expensive items. No one was there, so he just kept walking. I know it can happen, and has to me in the past, but something tells me from this guys looks and body language, that he was shoplifting.
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  #20  
Old 07-24-2012, 12:35 AM
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bare spot bare spot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herler View Post
That can still happen, contrary to popular belief flooding is not the opposite of a drought, rather in more than a few cases the two work together to where you can have a drought stricken area that gets flooded on a regular basis, doesn't make sense some people say... But the drought we are suffering from isn't just from lack of rain, it's because when it does rain it comes down fast and furious so there's no time for it to seep into the ground but rather most of it washes away...

When that happens trees and plants with deep root systems can't get any water so the plant adapts by allowing its roots to grow closer to the surface of the earth, unfortunately this also compromises plant stability so when a strong wind comes along it is very possible for shallow-rooted plants to simply uproot and fall over.

That is how desertification happens, slowly, over a number of years lush areas can turn to dirt as plant life disappears.

When over many years the rainfall is sporadic and when it does rain it comes down hard and fast, to make matters worse the erosion is amplified when we no longer have trees and plants to stop the water from running amuck, plant life normally slows erosion caused by run-off considerably...
Deserts in most cases are not made of sand, some people think it is but only a few of the world's deserts consist of sand as we know it.
Most deserts actually consist of good topsoil but erosion has so destroyed the landscape that little has a chance to take hold, meanwhile it gets very hot during the day and very cold during the night because dirt has little insulative quality, we as humans have ignored the problem for many years.

These deserts spread, every year more of the earth is turned into areas where nothing will grow and it is becoming difficult to ignore.
It started in Australia and Africa, now big parts of Asia are into it and most of northern Africa is all desert.
Today, America as a continent (both north and south) are starting to see it as well.
Currently about half the world is suffering from drought and flooding.

Now...
Flooding is what happens when several water run-offs converge in one area where it simply can not run off fast enough, when it runs off so fast that at some point it bottlenecks, that's all flooding is, some might say improper drainage but it's also a by-product of desertification...

Not sure if that helped lol
it helped me, well put.
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