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  #11  
Old 07-22-2012, 08:22 PM
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grass disaster grass disaster is offline
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I'm just seeding in some spots that tend to dry out quicker than the rest of the yard. Not reseed the whole thing
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  #12  
Old 07-23-2012, 09:09 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Originally Posted by JoJo1990 View Post
So lets say a customer, who has lived in the same home for 20 years, calls and says that they want their thinning lawn overseeded. Lets add that they don't irrigate but have the ability to do so during establishment. They hope to have a cool season grass blend to match their current yard that needs as few inputs as possible. You will tell them that since there are no "gene splicing" seeds available, they are out of luck?

Have you heard of NTEP?
What one hopes to find in more drought tolerant seeds, one will find the latest and the best, time tested on the shelves at the local hardware store or feed mill or seed mill... these companies stay in business by providing the local customer with the best available , when it's available...

Looking for something better, new and improved that hasn't been picked up by your local supplier is risky, in that it is not time tested... again,,, I will state that any advancements in what we already have available will be miniscule... it is for that reason I stress the concept of cultural practices to grow a lawn into maturity, being your best bet...

I probably have heard of NTEP,,, but what do those initials stand for???
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #13  
Old 07-23-2012, 12:54 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
What one hopes to find in more drought tolerant seeds, one will find the latest and the best, time tested on the shelves at the local hardware store or feed mill or seed mill... these companies stay in business by providing the local customer with the best available , when it's available...

Looking for something better, new and improved that hasn't been picked up by your local supplier is risky, in that it is not time tested... again,,, I will state that any advancements in what we already have available will be miniscule... it is for that reason I stress the concept of cultural practices to grow a lawn into maturity, being your best bet...

I probably have heard of NTEP,,, but what do those initials stand for???
Do you really think the sources you mention are selling the same seeds as they sold 5 years ago? Do you really think there have been no improvements in seeds in the last few years? Do you really think cultural methods trump genetic improvements in color, drought tolerance, insect and disease resistance?

Cultural methods not doubt play a large role in successfully managing turf grass, but they will only allow turf to reach it's genetic capacity.

NTEP.......National Turfgrass Evaluation Program http://www.ntep.org/
You should know this.
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  #14  
Old 07-23-2012, 02:22 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Plant testing for grasses, ag crops, perennials, garden annuals of both flowers and vegetables, trres etc., etc. have been around doing their thing for generations... and many commercial growers and sellers get information from these facilities...

And guess what??? These commercial sellers find out what will grow in our area and they purchase these seeds for sale to people in this area...

Is there a new drought resistant Per. Rye, KGB or RC Fescue that will perform in my area??? I'll go down to Jay-Mar and ask if there's anything new on the horizon...

If there is something on the internet or something that the testing facilities are working on then I'll wait for Jay-Mar to make it available, then,,, we know it is time tested to perform better than another variety that will now be discontinued...

Not too complicated,,, but growing mature lawns that can live up to its potential, seems to be...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #15  
Old 07-23-2012, 04:02 PM
JoJo1990 JoJo1990 is offline
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Axe - you are giving out some poor information.

If you want a reference close to you, take a look at the University of Minnesota turfgrass breeding program. Over several years, they have bred cultivars of fine leafed fescue, for example, that have shown dramatic improvements in both color and disease resistance. I bet the University of Madison has a similar program.

I appreciate your ambition, but if you are not aware of NTEP, you should not be giving out advice on seed cultivars. Dramatic improvements have been made in the past several years, and these new cultivars are not available from the sale shelf at the local hardware store.
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  #16  
Old 07-23-2012, 04:03 PM
JoJo1990 JoJo1990 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Looking for something better, new and improved that hasn't been picked up by your local supplier is risky, in that it is not time tested... again,,, I will state that any advancements in what we already have available will be miniscule...
Absolutely not true.
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  #17  
Old 07-23-2012, 05:02 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoJo1990 View Post
Axe - you are giving out some poor information.

If you want a reference close to you, take a look at the University of Minnesota turfgrass breeding program. Over several years, they have bred cultivars of fine leafed fescue, for example, that have shown dramatic improvements in both color and disease resistance. I bet the University of Madison has a similar program.

I appreciate your ambition, but if you are not aware of NTEP, you should not be giving out advice on seed cultivars. Dramatic improvements have been made in the past several years, and these new cultivars are not available from the sale shelf at the local hardware store.
If you were paying attention you'd have noticed that I did not give out any advice on seed cultivars...
You can believe that the new cultivars are dramatic improvements if you want to...It's a free thought zone...

I really do appreciate the research that goes into developing new cultivars, but I think the dramatic improvements of cool season grasses are far and few between... Tell me about one on the market now, that will be of notable distinction compared to what I already get, then I'll be wrong...

I've simply tried to make the point that your best drought resistance is in the handling of what you already have...

BTW, the NTEP evaluates based on certain criteria and have lots of growers help with testing in various climates and environmental situations... Are they able to declare that KBG 'xyz' is more drought tolerant than KBG 'xyy' for our OP in NY???
Bad information is found when one presumes that our OP will be able to create the same conditions as the test plots across the country...

2 yr turf in the sun on sandy soil w/out water for 3 weeks, will die sooner than the same turf in the shade, whether it the new cultivar or not... Let's get real...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #18  
Old 07-23-2012, 06:23 PM
JoJo1990 JoJo1990 is offline
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AXE:BTW, the NTEP evaluates based on certain criteria and have lots of growers help with testing in various climates and environmental situations... Are they able to declare that KBG 'xyz' is more drought tolerant than KBG 'xyy' for our OP in NY???
Bad information is found when one presumes that our OP will be able to create the same conditions as the test plots across the country...

[/I]


How about the U of M's sliding canopy where they can regulate sunlight on the NTEP test plots each day, every day, for as long as they like?

Don't like the above answer? Then we'll use locations. For example, the 2011 Kentucky Bluegrass trials are being done at the following locations:

Minnesota
Iowa
Washington
Virginia
Illinois
Kansas
New Jersey
Indiana
Maryland
Utah
Rhode Island

How's that for a geographic spread? They take evaluations from each of these locations, tally the results and make a final value for each cultivar. You can use state specific data or the best AVERAGE from all the above states.

This is not a backyard garden study.
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  #19  
Old 07-23-2012, 08:22 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Not the point of my post at all...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #20  
Old 07-23-2012, 08:33 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Not the point of my post at all...
Help us out here, what is the point of your post? You seam to be saying something, but when asked you say that's not what you meant. What do you mean?
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