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  #11  
Old 07-23-2012, 04:28 PM
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jrs.landscaping jrs.landscaping is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yardguy28 View Post
that's why they make stick edgers.

using a trimmer to edge does not produce a quality edge.
try stick edging over 500 flat headstones a week
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  #12  
Old 07-23-2012, 06:18 PM
B&SFTW B&SFTW is offline
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the obvious difference is the shape (duh), the main difference the shape makes is huge, though.

1.the blunt curved shaft can't reach under anything
2. straight shaft trimmers are typically easier to find in longer shaft lengths, and will make it easier to use if you're taller
3. try turning a curved shaft trimmer on it's side and using it to edge, or clean out cracks, ect...
4. the straight shaft uses less energy between the head and engine, so larger line and wider cutting paths are possible without bogging down the engine. looking for a trimmer without a clutch will also help the parasitic drag issue.
5. straight shafts are easier to make balanced, so they can be lower vibration than a comparable curved shaft trimmer.
6. all the really nice/fancy/powerful trimmers are straight shaft.

basically, straight shaft is superior to curved shaft in almost every aspect. the only way they aren't is curved shaft trimmers are easier to maneuver in tight spaces.
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  #13  
Old 07-23-2012, 07:49 PM
yardguy28 yardguy28 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
However, You can maintain one .
you could but I never would. doesn't look nearly as good or as professional.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs.landscaping View Post
try stick edging over 500 flat headstones a week
I stick edge 1000 pavers laid at an angle every week. you know when you look at it the ends make a "step" pattern.
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  #14  
Old 07-23-2012, 08:34 PM
herler herler is online now
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I still say the biggest difference is in the power, you can't and you won't deliver the same amount of torque and rpm's through a curved flex shaft than a straight one... Then only solid shafts take attachments, not all straight shafts have a solid axle but I can guarantee that all curved shafts are flex and hence won't tolerate an attachment.
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  #15  
Old 07-23-2012, 08:49 PM
B&SFTW B&SFTW is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herler View Post
I still say the biggest difference is in the power, you can't and you won't deliver the same amount of torque and rpm's through a curved flex shaft than a straight one... Then only solid shafts take attachments, not all straight shafts have a solid axle but I can guarantee that all curved shafts are flex and hence won't tolerate an attachment.
not true. the shaft is separated before the bend. at that point, there is no difference between a curved shaft and straight shaft trimmer.
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  #16  
Old 07-23-2012, 08:55 PM
yardguy28 yardguy28 is offline
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very true because I've owned both types of split shaft units.

when I first got into the business I had a split shaft ryobi, the trimmer was a curved shaft. now I own a stihl kombi motor with a straight shaft trimmer, shrub pruner and stick edger. both split way before the bend in the trimmer shaft.
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  #17  
Old 07-23-2012, 08:58 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B&SFTW View Post
not true. the shaft is separated before the bend. at that point, there is no difference between a curved shaft and straight shaft trimmer.
Wanna compare my curved Kombi edger attachment to my straight shaft edger attachment and get back with me on that?
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  #18  
Old 07-23-2012, 09:07 PM
yardguy28 yardguy28 is offline
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I think he's saying there is no difference in the power heads. and that makes sense.

a kombi motor is a great example. same power head different attachments. some attachments have a curved shaft and others have a straight shaft but all use the same power head.

not to mention it was said that you can't use a curved shaft on a split shaft. which is simply not true.
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  #19  
Old 07-23-2012, 09:10 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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He said the torque is not the same...now if he was talking about two equal power heads why would he say this. He was talking about the torque delivered to the end of the unit.
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  #20  
Old 07-23-2012, 09:27 PM
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Bumpmaster Bumpmaster is offline
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If you are just wanting to look like you are working but really just want to walk around an look at the scenery a curve shaft is the answer, like for the summer time when the yard dose not need trimmed but you can not convince the customer of this. Straight shaft is great for just putten your head down and gettin er duhn.
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