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  #71  
Old 07-30-2012, 08:37 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
Even then, with repeated scalping you will damage the turf.
It's Bermuda...roundup doesn't even damage it!
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  #72  
Old 07-30-2012, 10:59 PM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
Glad you finally came around.
Come around? I said the same thing I've always said -- the average bermudagrass lawn is best managed at 2".

You can take it as low as you're comfortable, but you're going to use more inputs to do it and it's going to cost more money.
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  #73  
Old 07-31-2012, 06:32 AM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Come around? I said the same thing I've always said -- the average bermudagrass lawn is best managed at 2".

You can take it as low as you're comfortable, but you're going to use more inputs to do it and it's going to cost more money.
I think the relationship of more inputs has more to do with the desired quality of grass.

What seemed to be missing was your rant about shortening the root system.
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  #74  
Old 07-31-2012, 06:39 AM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
I think the relationship of more inputs has more to do with the desired quality of grass.

What seemed to be missing was your rant about shortening the root system.
I agree with this. When kept short (below 2") Bermuda is very dense and does a great job staying free of weeds. So I would say that inputs would be less to a point.

I'm also believe there is a breaking point of cut height vs water usage as the more leaf and tissue the more surface area to lose hydration. I might be wrong and maybe you can shed some light on this Deukster.
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Last edited by cgaengineer; 07-31-2012 at 06:44 AM.
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  #75  
Old 07-31-2012, 06:49 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Originally Posted by cgaengineer View Post
I agree with this. When kept short (below 2") Bermuda is very dense and does a great job staying free of weeds. So I would say that inputs would be less.
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Glad I am not the only one who has observed this. Sure, bermuda can be maintained at over 1". Mowing is fast and cheap. However, in my area, hard to control grassy weeds soon take over. Mowing low is lower input than a herbicide program costing over $100 per acre and needing 4-5 applications at 30 day intervals with no guarantee of total removal.
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  #76  
Old 07-31-2012, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Glad I am not the only one who has observed this. Sure, bermuda can be maintained at over 1". Mowing is fast and cheap. However, in my area, hard to control grassy weeds soon take over. Mowing low is lower input than a herbicide program costing over $100 per acre and needing 4-5 applications at 30 day intervals with no guarantee of total removal.
It's also much easier to spot weeds in shorter turf. Making spot spraying much easier.

What's your take on Bermuda height vs irrigation requirements greendoctor? Would you say that taller Bermuda dries out faster than properly mowed at the correct height Bermuda?
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  #77  
Old 07-31-2012, 07:41 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Tall bermuda not only loses more water faster due to more leaf area, the thatch caused by high mowing makes it that much harder to get water into the lawn.
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  #78  
Old 07-31-2012, 08:44 AM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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I'm not going to dig up old bones here and take this thread in a wrong direction. University research confirms that shorter cut turf has shorter roots, requires more water, and requires more of other inputs. We've been through this before. I posted facts, others posted "I'm right, trust me."

In the end, you can maintain your lawns however you want. But, after years of research, years of extension phone calls from homeowners, and years of managing my own business, I have seen more problems with the short cut bermudagrass lawns than with the taller ones. That's all I'm saying.
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  #79  
Old 07-31-2012, 11:27 AM
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kennc38 kennc38 is offline
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Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
I'm not going to dig up old bones here and take this thread in a wrong direction. University research confirms that shorter cut turf has shorter roots, requires more water, and requires more of other inputs. We've been through this before. I posted facts, others posted "I'm right, trust me."

In the end, you can maintain your lawns however you want. But, after years of research, years of extension phone calls from homeowners, and years of managing my own business, I have seen more problems with the short cut bermudagrass lawns than with the taller ones. That's all I'm saying.
Not sure which university you're referring to, but NC State recommends a mowing height of 3/4 - 1": "Mow the lawn when it first turns green in the spring with a reel mower set at ¾ to 1 inch or a rotary mower set as low as possible without scalping. Mow before the grass gets taller than 1½ to 2 inches."

However, they also go on to state that common bermuda can be maintained at a higher mowing height: "Common bermudagrass (wiregrass), compared to hybrid bermudagrass (Tifway and Tifgreen), can be seeded and maintained at a higher mowing height."

http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/Turfgr....aspx#MC000016

I hope this information helps the readers of this thread.
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  #80  
Old 07-31-2012, 05:26 PM
Busa Dave Busa Dave is offline
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Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Tall bermuda not only loses more water faster due to more leaf area, the thatch caused by high mowing makes it that much harder to get water into the lawn.
Transpiration is always worse the more surface area that is exposed---made even wose by winds and low humidity.
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