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  #11  
Old 08-16-2012, 07:29 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
Exactly, cut that thing back, it's too overgrown.
He never posted pictures...I did. I won't cut them back because they will die back this winter. No sense in cutting them while they are blooming this late in the season.
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  #12  
Old 08-16-2012, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
Exactly, cut that thing back, it's too overgrown.
I would think given his location that mother nature ensures that he cuts it back in the spring following the freezes? I am still beating on moisture as the issue as it has been my experience that lack of blooms = lack of moisture or feeding. Again given that most of the country has been drought stricken....moisture. Unless of course the lawn food that he has been allowing to over broadcast into the beds has a herbicide in it?
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  #13  
Old 08-16-2012, 07:38 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgaengineer View Post
He never posted pictures...I did. I won't cut them back because they will die back this winter. No sense in cutting them while they are blooming this late in the season.
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What make's you think i was talking about your hibiscus.
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  #14  
Old 08-16-2012, 07:47 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
What make's you think i was talking about your hibiscus.
Because without a picture I don't know how you would determine the were too tall...unless I missed something in the OP's post.
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  #15  
Old 08-17-2012, 11:15 AM
JBRONCFAN JBRONCFAN is offline
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This Hibiscus grows the exact same height and width every year without a hitch. I only mulched to keep it from suffering/slacking over due to lack of water and it worked but no blooms. Have another theory.

I used the black and brown bags of mulch from Home Depot. I assume they dye it to get it those colors and the chemicals used probably leeched into the ground. I saved money but I should have used a local guy that dumps fresh mulch onto your driveway, which I will next year.

This Hibiscus dies down to the ground so once it looks obviously dead it gets chopped down to the ground.
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  #16  
Old 08-17-2012, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by JBRONCFAN View Post
This Hibiscus grows the exact same height and width every year without a hitch. I only mulched to keep it from suffering/slacking over due to lack of water and it worked but no blooms. Have another theory.

I used the black and brown bags of mulch from Home Depot. I assume they dye it to get it those colors and the chemicals used probably leeched into the ground. I saved money but I should have used a local guy that dumps fresh mulch onto your driveway, which I will next year.

This Hibiscus dies down to the ground so once it looks obviously dead it gets chopped down to the ground.
The chemicals used to dye mulch are from natural sources...usually clay based.
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  #17  
Old 08-18-2012, 10:01 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I had a number of Endless Summer Hydrangeas that never bloomed either... Could just be the weather...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #18  
Old 08-18-2012, 12:44 PM
JBRONCFAN JBRONCFAN is offline
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First, can't thank enough for the replies and support. Nice should to cry on.

I am almost positive now on what EXACTLY negatively affected my Hibiscus plant.

Like I said I went from mowing his lawn once a week to full time landscaping (with no landscaping experience).

I always knew we lived in a heavy, acidic area hence our world renown Jersey Tomatoes. I also knew if things were too acidic, it would be hard for the grass to absorb all the nutrients I pay for and apply.

Got lucky and found this great, cheap grass fertilizer totally organic and also found cheap lime that came in divot form. You know, small pieces as opposed to powder which is what I wanted.

Well, thinking back to my application process I am quite sure much of the lime divots got into the flower beds where my Knockout Roses were trying to grow and over course my Hibiscus.

I did a heavy gamble and swore up and down once I chopped this mini Christmas tree down that the spot in front of the two stumps we have would be enough sun for another Knockout Rose. All spring/summer it grew half assed. Daylilies did great, so did the Pardon Me's.

Now it's been a good two months since I did any kind of lime treatment (mostly cause everyone's grass goes dormant in the middle of the summer) and just a week ago the Knockout Rose bush just came to life!!! Big beautiful green leaves with beautiful white blooms (the only Knockout Rose so far that has an aroma).

What exactly can you add to soil to make it acidic??? I know people do this with their Hydrageas to affect their color. Think the Hibiscus is too far gone for this year and I'm gonna give my Knockout Rose another chance next year (and keep away any and all lime).

What do you guys think about my lime theory??
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  #19  
Old 08-19-2012, 10:28 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Lime is temporary at best in changing the pH... if the soil was fine before, it will be fine again... I would mulch it over with a bag of compost and see what happens... do you have any mulch around the root base now?
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #20  
Old 08-20-2012, 03:15 PM
JBRONCFAN JBRONCFAN is offline
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No, I cleared away any mulch from the root base a few weeks ago.

The Hibiscus has some blooms on it but the leaves have white spots on them and are brownish. Every single year they are beautiful and all you have to do is water them.
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