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  #21  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:10 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
Here is something I found about our soils.

Desired Ca: Mg Ratio 69:11
Calcium and magnesium are primarily responsible for a soil's physical structure, but they are also critical to a plant's development. Calcium loosens soil while magnesium acts as the glue to tighten soil. Soils that have 69% calcium and 11% magnesium are naturally mellow and crumbly. Many soils in Northeast Texas have both high Ca and Mg levels. For every percentage point Ca is over 69%, the same amount of Mg is being tied up, causing a tightening effect on the soil.
That kind of soil with excessive Ca needs treatment with sulfuric acid in the irrigation water or application of enough elemental sulfur to get the pH below 7. The Ca is probably in the form of calcium carbonate. Stone or concrete in plain English. Dealing with the excess carbonates is a worthy endeavor.

I often see a reverse of that ratio. Where Mg is over 11% and Ca is less than 50%. The rest of it being sodium.
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  #22  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:13 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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I will grab up some samples this week of a few accounts.
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  #23  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:15 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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We do need a good rain to flush the clay soils. The longer turf is on irrigation the worse it gets. IIRCC Ca is around 350 PPM as CaCO3
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  #24  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:15 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Originally Posted by WBuster View Post
Greendoctor i have a question for you. You said in HI inland soils are acidic right? So you obviously have a big difference in soil testing from one lawn to another. But funny thing is here in Columbus the southern side seems to test very consistent from lawn to lawn. I would never say a soil test is pointless but after having i dont know how many done only a few have been wildly different than the rest. Have you ever seen that before? I listen to you guys talk about the big differences in lawn to lawn but truthfully there is some here but not a lot??? An oldtimer here once told me that when the glaciers came down into north America i guess the line is somewhat close to Columbus so all those nutrients that melted off formed almost a perfect line on up. Not sure if he was just BS or what but you can kinda see it in soil test....
I most certainly see big differences in soil from lawn to lawn. Assumptions cannot be made about inland areas either. It has become a common construction practice to use coral as fill material on building sites. Might as well try to grow things on a mixture of lime and salt. Another issue is the Mg content of soil. In some areas, the Mg is high enough to cause serious problems with soil texture. This is something I cannot see. A test is required to verify. The no testing required way to do things is to do a 100% removal and replacement of existing material with compost. Fine for hobby gardeners, but not reasonable for lawns and large landscapes.
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  #25  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:18 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
We do need a good rain to flush the clay soils. The longer turf is on irrigation the worse it gets. IIRCC Ca is around 350 PPM as CaCO3
I have used liquid acids in that situation. A mild one that works well is 1/2 lb of citric acid per 1000 sq ft. This chelates and helps flush excessive bases.
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  #26  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:22 PM
WBuster WBuster is offline
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Sounds like lawn care on top of a volcano is alot more complicated
just pickin
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  #27  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:26 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
I have used liquid acids in that situation. A mild one that works well is 1/2 lb of citric acid per 1000 sq ft. This chelates and helps flush excessive bases.
Maybe that is one reason I like ferric citrate. Unfortuantely that was removed from my micro pack "flexx" when lebenon bought PHC.

I have also noticed less green up from it too.
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  #28  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:26 PM
WBuster WBuster is offline
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You know i have another question about HI Greendoctor. I was sitting here think the volcano probably is a cause of the high CEC and OM correct? But since your an island does the Salt air or Salt water play any kinda impact on your lawns?
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  #29  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:31 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
Maybe that is one reason I like ferric citrate. Unfortuantely that was removed from my micro pack "flexx" when lebenon bought PHC.

I have also noticed less green up from it too.
Sometimes I roll my own with citric acid and ferrous sulfate heptahydrate. That was before I discovered FEAture 6-0-0. Roots makes a Fe citrate chelate for turf use. I like it, but not the bulk of a 2.5 gallon bottle.
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  #30  
Old 08-19-2012, 03:34 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Sometimes I roll my own with citric acid and ferrous sulfate heptahydrate. That was before I discovered FEAture 6-0-0. Roots makes a Fe citrate chelate for turf use. I like it, but not the bulk of a 2.5 gallon bottle.
Does BWI carry this?
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