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  #41  
Old 08-23-2012, 12:40 PM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Salty water and sand are the appropriate place for Seashore Paspalum. This grass is hard to keep on acidic or even alkaline clay that does not have enough salt in it. It is quickly over run by bermuda and all manner of grassy weeds unless conditions are too sodic for anything else to survive.
I can't say that I agree. Seashore paspalum doesn't need high EC levels to survive -- it just has mechanism to deal with high EC levels. I've grown seashore paspalum in clayey soils in Georgia, Mississippi, and Arkansas with 5.0 pH, very little EC, and had great stands that outcompeted the surrounding bermudagrass.

The seashore paspalum breeding program at the University of Georgia even grows their breeding plots and maintains breeder's stock of paspalum cultivars on acidic, low EC, clay soil plots.
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  #42  
Old 08-24-2012, 10:43 AM
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Ric Ric is offline
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http://www.environmentalturf.com/research/417.pdf

This is a Link to a study on EC and the use of Sea Water for irrigation. In 1998 or 1999 I had the opportunity to help judge test plots for Dr Lee Brendt. His paper wasn't published until 2006.

I am sure Dr. Lee expanded on the simple experiment I was involved with. The first go around the soil was the standard USGA Green grades sand mix in 3 gallon containers. There were 30 container all growing Seashore Paspalum. He used 5 containers for each Trial.

The bottom line was 3 parts fresh water to 1 part sea water showed the best response. Part of our conclusion was the sea water (which at that time was being dipped off the surf at the local beach), had a certain amount of nutrients in it that were adding to the response. 5 to 1 and 4 to 1 samples survived but didn't show as strongh a response as 3 to 1 did.


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  #43  
Old 08-24-2012, 11:09 AM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ric View Post
.

http://www.environmentalturf.com/research/417.pdf

This is a Link to a study on EC and the use of Sea Water for irrigation. In 1998 or 1999 I had the opportunity to help judge test plots for Dr Lee Brendt. His paper wasn't published until 2006.

I am sure Dr. Lee expanded on the simple experiment I was involved with. The first go around the soil was the standard USGA Green grades sand mix in 3 gallon containers. There were 30 container all growing Seashore Paspalum. He used 5 containers for each Trial.

The bottom line was 3 parts fresh water to 1 part sea water showed the best response. Part of our conclusion was the sea water (which at that time was being dipped off the surf at the local beach), had a certain amount of nutrients in it that were adding to the response. 5 to 1 and 4 to 1 samples survived but didn't show as strongh a response as 3 to 1 did.


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Have you read the study? What you're saying doesn't match what the study says. Pay special attention to Quality Rating (Table 2) and Quality Parameters (Table 3).

For Quality Ratings, the 3:1 blend never outperformed tap water, and it even gave LOWER quality ratings on March 21. Figure 1 even shows nearly perfect declines in quality as salinity increases. For the Quality Parameters, Tap Water gave better leaf texture, higher clipping yield, more stolons, and longer stolons than the 3:1 blend, while chlorophyll content wasn't any different.

If you actually read the Berndt paper, it tells us that SeaDwarf quality will decrease with increasing salinity, but it won't be really bad.

Berndt's conclusion is far from saying that it gets better with sea water.
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  #44  
Old 08-24-2012, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
Have you read the study? What you're saying doesn't match what the study says. Pay special attention to Quality Rating (Table 2) and Quality Parameters (Table 3).

For Quality Ratings, the 3:1 blend never outperformed tap water, and it even gave LOWER quality ratings on March 21. Figure 1 even shows nearly perfect declines in quality as salinity increases. For the Quality Parameters, Tap Water gave better leaf texture, higher clipping yield, more stolons, and longer stolons than the 3:1 blend, while chlorophyll content wasn't any different.

If you actually read the Berndt paper, it tells us that SeaDwarf quality will decrease with increasing salinity, but it won't be really bad.

Berndt's conclusion is far from saying that it gets better with sea water.
No I have not read the study Recently. Yes I know the study shows a different conclusion. But remember this was long before Dr Lee set up a complete study testing water etc. The results could or were compromised on the 3 to 1 mix. Also if I remember correctly it wasn't a Dwarf variety we were judging.

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  #45  
Old 09-14-2012, 01:47 AM
timturf timturf is offline
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Get the soil chemistry correct!

Perfect ca 68% 12%mg 10%h 3-5%k, rest traces.
soils with cec below 10, general need a little less ca, and more mg

Too much Mg, will tighten the soil!
Very seldom see any micro defiences!

I bewlieve spoon feeding home lawns is unnecessary. Use a quality granular fertilizer

fwif my opion!
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  #46  
Old 03-01-2013, 11:32 PM
AllBrad AllBrad is offline
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