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Old 08-19-2012, 04:40 AM
WBuster WBuster is offline
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Liquid Fert Micros Vs Dry Greendoctor or Ric Maybe

Okay I think Greendoctor or Ric maybe about to help me on this one.

Ive always run a good dry program. I use liquids when the temps cool, i usually use what most economical and best for my customers lawns. (Generally coron) Im thinking of switching things up this fall. But i keep thinking if its not broke dont fix it.

So... I was thinking of running some Uflexx with Micros probably from Growth Products or maybe lebanon turf. Im just trying to go the best and most economical and we all know thats not so easy.

Have any of you guys run Uflexx with micros with any luck?

I actually tried out Uflexx blended with some potash and FE this past spring on my own lawn. Needless to say i was quite impressed with the results.

I was thinking of going that route this fall with micros. What do you liquid guys think?

Also i should point out the south columbus area of ohio seems to mainly need N we have done i dont know how many soil test and most but not all come back with adequate P and K levels must be the easy part of the country I know alot of you other guys arent so lucky
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Old 08-19-2012, 10:53 AM
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Ric Ric is offline
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My first concern is the (CEC) Chemical holding power of the soil when switching to a Liquid program. I am thinking your soil south of Columbus is pretty good, but I don't know it.

My goal in designing a program is economics as well as response. I don't always use the most expensive products. For me to use a slow release liquid would be foolish because my sand would leach it out before it could release. By the same token a soil with High Chemical holding power might not benefit enough to justify the cost of slow release.

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Old 08-19-2012, 10:59 AM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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I have mixed Uflexx with the Micros added seperately. Uflexx is stabilize, not slow release. I do not see the color responce that I like from Urea.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:15 PM
WBuster WBuster is offline
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Duekster what type of soil do you guys have in TX? Im surprised the regular old urea and micros had a better color response for you. So do you mean a better color or faster response? I thought the same here when i tried it in the spring with FE on my own lawn but funny thing is after about the 7th day it started really comeing around. To me it did have a slow color response but the green i felt was more of that emerald green not urea green if that makes sense. Ofcoarse the Fe had alot to do with that as well.
Plus it seemed more less like a slow release it didnt get that Jolt of growth for three weeks where you mowing every other day then on the fourth-fifth week it looks like crap.
Come to think of it maybe i should have split my yard in two and tried half with regular urea+FE and the other half with uflexx+FE.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:16 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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We have clay. I am saying Urea of any type does not seem to give good color responce. Part of it maybe that I also use some Primo.

Ric once mentioned needing mg but I have Mg in my micro mix.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:25 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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I have clay as well in most lawns. With very high OM and CEC. In other words, many materials are locked up if applied to the soil. Urea does not give me a desired result either. Low rates not likely to cause surge growth also do not give me a nice green. I get more mileage out of Ammonium Sulfate because it supplies sulfur and acidifies soil. For the reason of alkaline soil that locks up everything applied to it, my best response to micronutrients happens when I spray it. Having it in non chelated form in granules is not worth it. It is actually less money and labor for me to spray on low rates as a liquid rather than have to deal with purchasing tonnage of granules, hauling it, spreading it, then cleaning it up off of non target areas. Micronutrient granules will leave stains on concrete and stone surfaces that can be very hard to remove.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:29 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
We have clay. I am saying Urea of any type does not seem to give good color responce. Part of it maybe that I also use some Primo.

Ric once mentioned needing mg but I have Mg in my micro mix.
I would check Mg levels in the soil before adding more. If they are low, I would use either mag nitrate or chelated Mg. The most spectacular color response from such a fertilization happens on calcium and magnesium deficient lawns growing in inland areas on the rare acid soil. I apply 15-5-15 Cal-Mag Special and the lawn turns almost blue. This is on zoysia that is normally fluorescent yellow growing on acidic, Ca, Mg deficient soil.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:31 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
I would check Mg levels in the soil before adding more. If they are low, I would use either mag nitrate or chelated Mg. The most spectacular color response from such a fertilization happens on calcium and magnesium deficient lawns growing in inland areas on the rare acid soil. I apply 15-5-15 Cal-Mag Special and the lawn turns almost blue. This is on zoysia that is normally fluorescent yellow growing on acidic, Ca, Mg deficient soil.
10-4 I will pull some samples this week.

Seiously doubt Ca is the issue since we have so much around and in the H2O
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:35 PM
WBuster WBuster is offline
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Hmmm... i wonder about the primo i havent used any growth regulators up here we dont do any mowing. I've heard it gives great latteral results in the turf for you southern guys. Dont know anyone up here that runs it. Plus if i remember correctly its pretty expensive.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:44 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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Originally Posted by Duekster View Post
10-4 I will pull some samples this week.

Seiously doubt Ca is the issue since we have so much around and in the H2O
I always check soil because adding more Mg, to a soil with a Ca/Mg imbalance can create problems. It is very possible to have too much Ca in relation to everything else. I need to walk away when "pros" are spreading either gypsum or epsom salts and they have no idea of their soil levels. The actual problem is normally high pH, too much Ca or Mg, low sulfur, and low Fe,Mn. The solution for that does not normally go through a fert spreader.
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