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  #31  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:37 AM
suzook suzook is offline
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Location: long island NY
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I don't understand the hate on this board about rye. Down south? Sure, but up north? It does just fine. Is KBG better? Absolutely! But a properly maintained rye lawn can look great.
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  #32  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:45 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I do a lot of patch work on damaged sod that is of course pure KBG hybrid... therefore I use straight KBG seed... it is not more difficult to establish or start and it doesn't need the 2-3`X a day sprinkling to germinate, it only needs the correct environment...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #33  
Old 09-30-2012, 04:59 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
...it doesn't need the 2-3`X a day sprinkling to germinate...
Never heard that before. Explain?
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  #34  
Old 10-01-2012, 08:46 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maynardGkeynes View Post
Never heard that before. Explain?
It is obvious that perfect moisture, temp, light and air, inside the appropriate cover would germinate grass... however, that doesn't occur in the field, so why push the issue...

What we do have is seed that will germinate when it is ready... plenty of moisture to be sure, but this time of year we don't bake the seed once it has started to soak up water...

any ways, once the ground is soaked with the seed, an properly covered, it can sometimes germinate and grow with no further irrigation... I've done this with a compost covering just again this year... neglected areas that were seeded, cover with compost, soaked and left to dry out because I couldn't get back to the with a sprinkler for a week...

even during the summer months, the dog spots get hit with a small handful of KBG and with a brief daily watering, it comes up all during the summer... seed worked onto the soil, that relies solely on rain will sit and wait for rain and many times germinate when it comes...

The main reason people started the constant watering was becuz they could,,,, and becuz they could often times get quick germination by doing so... quick isn't that necessary when over seeding in the Fall,,, especially when you consider what is happening to your existing turf during that process...
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*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #35  
Old 10-01-2012, 12:07 PM
brown thumb brown thumb is offline
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I've always prefered one watering in the evening in the fall time to decrease evaporation and increase the wet stratification that helps with quicker germination. Once you get emergence, then morning watering is best...but, the dew is usually pretty heavy in the fall, that is plenty of moisture in the right environment to keep things progressing in many cases.
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  #36  
Old 10-01-2012, 12:33 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Axe, thanks for the response. I get your point now. The standard advice, which is to keep the seedbed moist, seems ok to me, but the problem I see is that people think that means to keep it wet all the time, which does a lot of damage. Maybe the seed companies should advise more along the lines of "keep the seedbed from drying out."
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  #37  
Old 10-02-2012, 07:09 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Riggle also did the experiment of soaking the seed for 24 - 72 hours, then dry out the seed... then plant the seed and would get a quicker than normal response... the seedbed staying moist,,, especially the material covering the seed would likely help,,, but as Riggle's experiment showed,,, seed can get soaked,,, then dry out then germinate at a later time...

When I sense that the ground has become anaerobic, because of constant high moisture levels, I let it dry out for a couple of days, then resume watering, at a lessor volume, and that usually does the trick...
__________________
*
Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #38  
Old 10-02-2012, 08:50 AM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Thanks Axe, that is helpful (and interesting).
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