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  #11  
Old 11-01-2012, 10:06 AM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Why would someone in Iowa, use Logan Labs in Ohio??? Are you hawking for Logan Labs???
Why does it matter where the lab is? Logan Labs happens to use the same soil testing methods (extractions, calculations, etc) that the Iowa State lab uses. So, the results would be the same, whether they were tested in Iowa or at Logan Labs.

Why is soil testing such a hard thing for people to understand?
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  #12  
Old 11-02-2012, 09:29 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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What was my question? and how does the response address my question?? And what about my question , indicates that I don't understand how soil testing works???

I really hope there is not someone else, that is just here to cause trouble...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #13  
Old 11-02-2012, 09:28 PM
timturf timturf is offline
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Location: central virgina, transition, plant hardy zone 7a, and heat index zone 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Why would someone in Iowa, use Logan Labs in Ohio??? Are you hawking for Logan Labs???
Just a great lab that I use
I make my own recommendations from their results

Find a QUALITY LAB, and only use that lab.
Don't compare test results sent to more than 1 lab
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Timothy J Murphy Specializing in Quality Turf
Bs in Plant and Soil Science
Almost 40 yrs exp., 20 as GC superintendent
Primarly work with cool season turf
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  #14  
Old 01-23-2013, 04:46 PM
CJFDFF CJFDFF is offline
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I got to agree with everybody that says its in the roots! You have to build up your roots, hard soils do not allow the roots to get into the ground water. There are a lot of products out there that will help you out. I must ask do you mulch you yard when you mow, or do you bag and remove the clippings?
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  #15  
Old 01-24-2013, 10:14 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJFDFF View Post
I got to agree with everybody that says its in the roots! You have to build up your roots, hard soils do not allow the roots to get into the ground water. There are a lot of products out there that will help you out. I must ask do you mulch you yard when you mow, or do you bag and remove the clippings?
One of the surest ways to help the roots is to have OM sitting on the surface allowing the sub-terrainian creatures move it into the root zone...
Bagging, dethatching and even raking is counter-productive to soil structure and its ability to maintain CE sites and the adequate water/air ratio...
I read one article recently that stated the pores in the soil should be 40-60% of the area of the soil... OM definately helps create porosity in the soil... too much water destroys porosity...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #16  
Old 01-24-2013, 10:23 AM
CJFDFF CJFDFF is offline
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SmallAxe could not agree with you more, you can use gypsum to help loosen up the dirt and help the root mass go even deeper, giving it more access to the ground water that is present about all year around. There are many factors that go into keeping your lawn green, but if you can reduce your dependency on a fertilizer or a chemical or even extra water, and start trying to build up your OM and you will def see good results. If your going to use a gypsum or a power lime, your not going to be able to broad cast spread this, you will need a drop spreader
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  #17  
Old 01-25-2013, 06:55 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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We have no real need for gypsum or even lime in the lawns I care for... My comment was to reinforce the idea that OM is going to be more useful than fertilizer... OM can actually build a more plant friendly soil structure, overcoming the drawbacks of whatever texture the lawn is... at least to some degree, OM helps overcome less than perfect textures... especially in the addition of usable CE sites...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #18  
Old 01-25-2013, 07:13 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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To clarify what I meant about OM being more useful than fertilizer,,, the point here is that w/out correct access to the ferts, becuz of structureless soils w/out OM, we see that 'more fert', does NOT address the real issue... that is what is meant by OM being more useful...
I was NOT saying that OM replaces fertilizer...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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