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  #11  
Old 11-02-2012, 03:38 AM
acculawnsystems acculawnsystems is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Columbia, MO
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Posting prices on your Website?

With 16 years experience as an LCO we have given bids by physically going to the job site and then we decided 3 years ago to start giving instant quotes right on out website. The website version has been the most effective method of gaining new customers. We base out bids on the sq footage of the yard and ask a few questions like do you have a fence or pool, etc and are able to charge accordingly. We have been able to give more bids and gain more customers this way without spending much time and fuel bidding. We have recently launched a program that will help your company to use the same method. Check it out at AccuLawnSystems.com.
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  #12  
Old 11-02-2012, 06:03 AM
nepatsfan nepatsfan is offline
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Location: Franklin MA
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We deal with mostly high end customers. Two reasons why you shouldn't post your prices. If you post your prices you are going after price shoppers. Not the people I wanna go after. If you wanna go after the price shoppers than all the other lowballers in the area will know what you are charging and be able to lowball you back.

As far as doing instant quotes on line-again live by the price sword die by the price sword. At the very least take a look at the job and sell the job on the phone, otherwise go to the property and meet with the customer. My closing rates are significantly higher when selling myself and my product rather than how cheap we can do it. Tell them what you do differently from the 50,000 landscapers around you. When someone goes to your website and looks for prices they are going to go with the cheapest.
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  #13  
Old 11-02-2012, 07:30 AM
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cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
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Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nepatsfan View Post
we deal with mostly high end customers. Two reasons why you shouldn't post your prices. If you post your prices you are going after price shoppers. Not the people i wanna go after. If you wanna go after the price shoppers than all the other lowballers in the area will know what you are charging and be able to lowball you back.

As far as doing instant quotes on line-again live by the price sword die by the price sword. At the very least take a look at the job and sell the job on the phone, otherwise go to the property and meet with the customer. My closing rates are significantly higher when selling myself and my product rather than how cheap we can do it. Tell them what you do differently from the 50,000 landscapers around you. When someone goes to your website and looks for prices they are going to go with the cheapest.
and thus another reason not to post prices!
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  #14  
Old 11-02-2012, 07:50 AM
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lawnkingforever lawnkingforever is offline
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Location: Pittsburgh PA
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I will always bid a yard in person and do a walkthrough with the homeowner. Knowing expectations from both parties is vital for avoiding problems down the road. I can always weed out a pita in person. Like others have said you could leave money on the table by not meeting with the homeowner in person.
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  #15  
Old 11-02-2012, 12:12 PM
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headz77 headz77 is online now
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Location: PDX, OR
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Most of the larger LCO's here post prices online. Prices don't necessarily attract bargain hunters. If your prices are towards the high end for your area, it can actually weed those people out. Your competitors already know what everyone charges, basically. The more info you feel comfortable putting online, the better.
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  #16  
Old 11-02-2012, 12:37 PM
herler herler is online now
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I wouldn't do it because those are my prices, so I feel that in ways it's like giving away the secret sauce recipe.
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  #17  
Old 11-02-2012, 01:55 PM
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RiggitanoLandscape RiggitanoLandscape is offline
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Location: Middletown, DE
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Personally I would price by the neighborhood. Subdivisions built in the last 20 years are all about the same size lawns. For me it does not matter about stuff in the yard because i have a full time trimmer and two people in the lawn mowers. What I like to do is go around an entire zip code and price every house out a head of time and write it down and file it. Then when someone calls in ask for the address and then you will all ready have done the pricing and can give them a price on the spot.

I personally in the past have got trouble with subdivisions when one is priced different from another. A lot of neighbors talk to each other and you have to realize that most of them are going to be city slickers that buy big homes in the suburbs the never cut a lawn in their life.

My business runs off the idea that you get as many lawns as you can in one neighborhood so when you go their you have 5 lawns without moving the trailer and make really good timing
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  #18  
Old 11-02-2012, 03:55 PM
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tonygreek tonygreek is online now
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Location: Lancaster, PA
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Quote:
I will always bid a yard in person and do a walkthrough with the homeowner.
I agree with lawnkingforever.

Posting a price immediately can rule you in or out for a client. If you're not dealing with large, you can take it or leave it, customer volume, meeting with a client to give an estimate allows you the opportunity to sell yourself and your company. If the people who think you're a bit too high, and therefore don't call you, you don't even give yourself a chance to be a deal closer.
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  #19  
Old 11-02-2012, 04:31 PM
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inzane inzane is online now
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Location: Dallas, GA
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i was gonna ask a similar question.. i've added starting prices on my website. for instance, mowing starting at $40.00 weekly.. dunno.. trying to weed out the cheapskates.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy123 View Post
I've been trying to think about Lawn Care websites from the customers perspective...not sure if this is helpful. But, what are some thoughts about posting prices on a website? Maybe breaking down prices for up to x amount of square feet, etc.?

Please let me know if this is a bad idea or a good business plan.
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  #20  
Old 11-02-2012, 09:01 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpllawncare View Post
I learned early on, NEVER! I mean NEVER give a quote without seeing it first, customers can tell you anything! then when you show up for that $50 dollar a week cut and it turns out to be a 60 or 70 dollar a week cut your screwed.
I'm wondering since our markets are different if that's why I can quote a property without seeing it. I look up the property on google earth and can figure out if there's a fence, etc. (along with asking very specific questions to the customer) and I'm good.
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