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  #11  
Old 12-25-2012, 06:46 PM
Green-Man Green-Man is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fwilamosky View Post
only reason going with the gasser is starting and stopping a diesel 15 times a day isn't good. I've heard good things about the 6.7 however
Just out of curiosity if it is bad for a diesel to be stopping and starting 15 times a day why would company's like Isuzu put Diesel engines in their landscape trucks?
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  #12  
Old 12-25-2012, 08:38 PM
Monroe74 Monroe74 is offline
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New Super Duty

It used to be bad for diesels to start 15 times a day before computer controls and direct injection.
Mainly due to coking and the over fueling of the older diesels.
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  #13  
Old 12-25-2012, 09:43 PM
Green-Man Green-Man is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Monroe74 View Post
It used to be bad for diesels to start 15 times a day before computer controls and direct injection.
Mainly due to coking and the over fueling of the older diesels.
What would you consider old? So it "use" to be bad olay thanks for the answer!
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  #14  
Old 12-26-2012, 11:03 PM
Monroe74 Monroe74 is offline
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New Super Duty

I would say 1990 and older. It wasn't till 94 ish that diesels became really reliable for delivery/service work with the starting and stopping of the engine.
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Last edited by Monroe74; 12-26-2012 at 11:08 PM.
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  #15  
Old 12-26-2012, 11:42 PM
Green-Man Green-Man is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Monroe74 View Post
I would say 1990 and older. It wasn't till 94 ish that diesels became really reliable for delivery/service work with the starting and stopping of the engine.
Alright thanks a lot man I never knew this. Really appreciate it!
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  #16  
Old 12-29-2012, 01:47 AM
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PlantscapeSolutions PlantscapeSolutions is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fwilamosky View Post
I'm am thinking about getting a new truck if I reach my goals for clients next year. I currently have a Sierra 1/2 ton and have found myself maxed out for towing. It sucks since I bought this truck in March! I need something that can tow the needed weight when I'm mulching, hauling stone, firewood,etc... I'm looking for any reviews on the super duties either 2012 or 2013. I would buy a gasser 6.2l ext cab 4x4 350 srw. It max bumper tows around 16000 pounds so that'll work


Any reviews would be helpful
The first thing you had better realize is that gas trucks have inflated towing numbers and Diesels are underrated. A 6.2 gasser is going to get it's azz handed to it trying to tow 16K up even a mild hill. I'm not a Ford fan but the 6.7 will easily tow twice as much as the 6.2. Heavy duty truck with gas engines are nothing more then false hope. The resale value of a gasser HD is crap as well.

All the new Diesel trucks run DEF now so starting and stopping is not an issue. Depending on where you live you can do DPF deletes as well like I did. If your going to be hauling anything over even 6-8K in hills the gasser is really going to disappoint you. If you can foot the bill go with an oil burner and forget all those weak gassers.
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  #17  
Old 12-29-2012, 01:55 AM
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McG_Landscaping McG_Landscaping is online now
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I have an 08 250 with the 5.4 and absolutely love the thing! Its not the smoothest ride but with my sides on (before the insert) it would carry 5 yards of mulch. I probably overload it but sometimes I will put 2 ton in it if its a short trip. I recently had 2 rear leafs added to each side because of the dump insert. now when i put 2 ton of salt in it, it barely squats. Itll still run 65 down the highway fully loaded with a plow. I'm going to stick with buying fords
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  #18  
Old 12-29-2012, 09:01 AM
jbturf jbturf is offline
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imo, now a days gas or diesel have adequate power to haul anything the trucks are rated for,
its more about transmissions, gears, heavy duty frames, suspension components, and BRAKES.
how many people keep there trucks much beyond 100k miles now, the majority have deprecated them by that
piont and small repairs are likely to start surfacing after that, so most are traded or sold for new or moved to backup duty. i personally cant see a diesel equipped lt duty truck kept less than 200k miles being a financial advantage in any way
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  #19  
Old 12-29-2012, 02:46 PM
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PlantscapeSolutions PlantscapeSolutions is offline
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I would suggest talking to the dealer if you are serious about buying a gasser for towing. See if they will let you hook up your trailer with a load on it and go for a test drive. Make sure you try the load on some moderate hills. The 6.2 might anemically haul 16K in the flats (pulling out in traffic will be a stressful time consuming experience) but if you head for a decent 10% grade like we have here in places things are going to get ugly. For light (4K) to medium (6K) duty towing on a regular basis where you put lows annual millage (10-15k) on your truck a weaker gasser will work. The F350 SRW 4x4 Super Cab is rated for 12.3K as well not 16K for bumper pulling. If your unhappy with your current ride you better test drive with a trailer before you get on the hook with a new ride that may not be much better.

There a huge difference between a plow truck setup and a truck used for towing where the GCWR could be double. With the new DEF trucks your operating cost per mile towing even 6K is going to be less then a gasser. Trucks now don't rust out at 100K like they used to. My plan for trucks is to have then for ten years and rack up 175-200K at most. A gas truck towing even 8K is going to get single digit gas millage while a Diesel won't see much of a drop. In 100K miles you will get back the extra money spent on a Diesel. Your really only spending a few thousand dollars extra for a Diesel because at resale you will get back much of the extra money you invested. If you think of a Diesel as $8000 down the drain you are way off base.

I run an 06 Ram 2500 that pulls my 16' enclosed trailer that weighs only around 4-5K. The Diesel motor at 100K now has paid for it's self. It makes 610 ft lbs of torque at 1500 rpms and I couldn't imagine having any less power like a 400 ft lb gas engine that make peak torque closer to a less usable 3000 rpms.

My daily driver truck is an 09' Ram 3500 4x4 but it's used to pull as much as 27,000 lbs which is not in the realm of what your looking to do. Once you get to even 10K plus your in oil burner only territory if you want to man handle the load safely with ease.

If you can swing it in the budget get the 6.7 and you will be blown away at how much more power it has for towing. You rarely hear guys complaining that their truck has too much power. Overkill is always a good thing.
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  #20  
Old 12-29-2012, 03:34 PM
Green-Man Green-Man is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlantscapeSolutions View Post
I would suggest talking to the dealer if you are serious about buying a gasser for towing. See if they will let you hook up your trailer with a load on it and go for a test drive. Make sure you try the load on some moderate hills. The 6.2 might anemically haul 16K in the flats (pulling out in traffic will be a stressful time consuming experience) but if you head for a decent 10% grade like we have here in places things are going to get ugly. For light (4K) to medium (6K) duty towing on a regular basis where you put lows annual millage (10-15k) on your truck a weaker gasser will work. The F350 SRW 4x4 Super Cab is rated for 12.3K as well not 16K for bumper pulling. If your unhappy with your current ride you better test drive with a trailer before you get on the hook with a new ride that may not be much better.

There a huge difference between a plow truck setup and a truck used for towing where the GCWR could be double. With the new DEF trucks your operating cost per mile towing even 6K is going to be less then a gasser. Trucks now don't rust out at 100K like they used to. My plan for trucks is to have then for ten years and rack up 175-200K at most. A gas truck towing even 8K is going to get single digit gas millage while a Diesel won't see much of a drop. In 100K miles you will get back the extra money spent on a Diesel. Your really only spending a few thousand dollars extra for a Diesel because at resale you will get back much of the extra money you invested. If you think of a Diesel as $8000 down the drain you are way off base.

I run an 06 Ram 2500 that pulls my 16' enclosed trailer that weighs only around 4-5K. The Diesel motor at 100K now has paid for it's self. It makes 610 ft lbs of torque at 1500 rpms and I couldn't imagine having any less power like a 400 ft lb gas engine that make peak torque closer to a less usable 3000 rpms.

My daily driver truck is an 09' Ram 3500 4x4 but it's used to pull as much as 27,000 lbs which is not in the realm of what your looking to do. Once you get to even 10K plus your in oil burner only territory if you want to man handle the load safely with ease.

If you can swing it in the budget get the 6.7 and you will be blown away at how much more power it has for towing. You rarely hear guys complaining that their truck has too much power. Overkill is always a good thing.
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