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  #11  
Old 01-14-2013, 07:20 AM
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toddharmon toddharmon is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Bethlehem Ga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herler View Post
First off it's middle of winter so the weed problem didn't start last week and this isn't the time of year to treat it, someone experienced could go out there and educate the customer, I wouldn't mind doing it mostly for PR reasons...

Unfortunately, I'm 900 miles out of the way.



It's the same in the Northeast and it takes time because of the cost involved, not only can you only take it certain days but it's not cheap either and so failure isn't something most want to consider, thus it's generally advisable folks study up for it, for that one has to order the material and it's no small amount...

It is, truthfully, a process.
Thanks everyone.
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  #12  
Old 01-14-2013, 11:48 AM
Sean Adams Sean Adams is offline
 
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Location: Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toddharmon View Post
Got a call this morning from a homeowner and he told me that he was having weed problems. He said he had just had his lawn torn up and had it sodded with bermuuda I think. He had the sodders leave some areas bare so he could have some landscaping done. He was also talking about having several weed and feed applications done throughout the year. What are you guys thoughts on how much to bid this type of full service care. What is the best type of weed and feed I should use? How ofton shall I apply it? I'm a new company and this is the types of customers want to serve. Any and all tips would be greatly appreciated.
Also, I have seen in this dormant phase people's grasses are really lush green lawns while their neighbors is brown or gray. How can I make dormant grass green in late season months?

Thanks!!

Todd
There are a few options I think you have:

1.) Walk away from this opportunity. You are not prepared to do this work just yet. I recognize it is the type of work you want to do, but if you experiment or attempt to learn on a client's lawn with no previous experience, no license, and the inability to identify diseases, turf types, etc. then you are asking for a problem.

2.) Crash course cramming. Get licensed, get online and study everything you can about this type of work. Get outside and actually test yourself - look at turf types, diseases, etc. and see if you can identify them and recognize how to treat/repair them. Read the lawn care section of this forum - don't ask questions right away, just read and soak in the information. Go to http://www.weedalert.com as well.

3.) Contact a certified, licensed, insured service provider you feel comfortable with and explain your situation. Develop a relationship with him. Ask him if he will do the work as a subcontractor and make sure you are on site with him - watch him (or his employees), learn from the process.
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  #13  
Old 01-14-2013, 11:54 AM
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toddharmon toddharmon is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Bethlehem Ga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Adams View Post
There are a few options I think you have:

1.) Walk away from this opportunity. You are not prepared to do this work just yet. I recognize it is the type of work you want to do, but if you experiment or attempt to learn on a client's lawn with no previous experience, no license, and the inability to identify diseases, turf types, etc. then you are asking for a problem.

2.) Crash course cramming. Get licensed, get online and study everything you can about this type of work. Get outside and actually test yourself - look at turf types, diseases, etc. and see if you can identify them and recognize how to treat/repair them. Read the lawn care section of this forum - don't ask questions right away, just read and soak in the information. Go to http://www.weedalert.com as well.

3.) Contact a certified, licensed, insured service provider you feel comfortable with and explain your situation. Develop a relationship with him. Ask him if he will do the work as a subcontractor and make sure you are on site with him - watch him (or his employees), learn from the process.
Thank you. I appreciate everyone's comments and input.
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  #14  
Old 01-14-2013, 12:46 PM
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KeystoneLawn&Landscaping KeystoneLawn&Landscaping is offline
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I would support Seans third option. I've been doing aps for 7 years, but still use a locally based company for very large properties.
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  #15  
Old 01-14-2013, 12:59 PM
Darryl G Darryl G is offline
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In my state even if you subcontract application services you still need to register your business with the state. Be sure to check if there is a similar requirement in your state if you take that route.
If a company which does not employ a certified commercial supervisor wishes to bid on (solicit) a contract that includes commercial pesticide applications, they may subcontract the pesticide application to a second company which is properly registered. The unregistered company must then comply with all pertinent laws and regulations including, but not limited to, the following:

registering as a commercial pesticide application business;
having the subcontractor complete Part VII (subcontracting information) of the registration form and sign Part VIII of the application;
maintaining the pesticide business records;
notifying individuals on the registry of pesticide applications; and
providing pesticide label information prior to contract agreements to all customers.
The certified supervisor must comply with all pertinent laws and regulations including, but not limited to:

being present at the time of the pesticide application or provide written instructions to certified operators;
posting outdoor applications with the name of the subcontracted company;
maintaining required pesticide application records; and
submitting the annual pesticide-use summary.
This is why I just refer applications out.
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