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Old 11-25-2014, 11:55 PM
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Stuttering Stan Stuttering Stan is offline
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Rapelling for those high, steep roofs

How many here actually use ropes and work from the shingles on those high rooflines? I am frustrated with moving ladders or not being able to reach those high points. From a production standpoint, it is worth the increased danger to work from the roof? If so, what equipment do you have (carabiners, kernmantle rope, class II harness, etc), what anchor points do you use.
I have mixed thoughts on the increased danger vs. being able to tackle those high rooflines.
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Old 11-26-2014, 09:05 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is offline
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I also would like to know the anchor point.
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Old 11-26-2014, 02:50 PM
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Stuttering Stan Stuttering Stan is offline
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For anchor points, I would guess a chimney as the first point and something on the rear of the house (tree, deck) as a secondary anchor. But, I do have concerns about rope abrasions when crossing the peak, gutters, etc.
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Old Today, 03:09 PM
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GreenI.A. GreenI.A. is online now
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Rope abrasion isn't much of a concern. Arborist have their ropes pulling back and forth over rough branches all the time. When working on a roof your using a single rope technique, so your line isn't constantly sliding back and forth. It would be very similar to how roofing companies tie in. The rope usually hangs off the other side of the house and is anchored to a large tree or truck. Obviously you have to know the angles so that the rope going off the opposite side doesn't damage the gutter. You also have to know the amount of lateral side-to-side moving you can do be fire you risk the rope sliding along the ridge line on you. You also have to take precautions so that a employee doesn't absentmindedly jump in to the truck your using as an anchor. Most states do not alow roofers to use the chimney as an anchor, this may also be Oshawa I'm not sure. OSHA has specific classes and certification for tieing in on roofs for construction/roofing. I would assume they would be applicable to lighting as well.
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Old Today, 04:47 PM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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Use a roof pipe anchor. They usually go in the exhaust pipe
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