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Old 02-10-2013, 12:01 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is offline
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Overkill or Not

Any one else thinking this way on Warm-Season Turf? In late fall/autumn Japanese beetles, June bugs, mask beetles lay egg or go into the soil. We didn't see that many but I'd bet they are there. By now they have developed into Grubs and are almost ready to surface into more beetles. I'm thinking since they are moving up towards the surface, that a spring April-May application of Dylox would kill them. I've read that the feeding during this time slows. Maybe earlier, ie, March-April would be more effective. Generally a late Spring, May-June application of Imidacloprid (Merit) prevents the grubs. Any thoughts, I've been doing this for the last three years and would be interested to see how others deal with grubs on warm-season turf. So far, no grubs.
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Old 02-10-2013, 12:30 PM
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ELS Landscape ELS Landscape is offline
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Dylox is effective all the time and is not cost effective to use as a preventive IMHO. It is best as a rescue application because it is effective in all seasons as a contact killer.


Dig in the ground and find grubs before treating for them please!!!
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Old 02-10-2013, 01:43 PM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAlmaroad View Post
Any one else thinking this way on Warm-Season Turf? In late fall/autumn Japanese beetles, June bugs, mask beetles lay egg or go into the soil. We didn't see that many but I'd bet they are there. By now they have developed into Grubs and are almost ready to surface into more beetles. I'm thinking since they are moving up towards the surface, that a spring April-May application of Dylox would kill them. I've read that the feeding during this time slows. Maybe earlier, ie, March-April would be more effective. Generally a late Spring, May-June application of Imidacloprid (Merit) prevents the grubs. Any thoughts, I've been doing this for the last three years and would be interested to see how others deal with grubs on warm-season turf. So far, no grubs.
Roy, I know you are a pro and know what you are doing and I know that you know that grubs don't always have to be found to be treated for (preventative), especially in lawns that have a history of infestation.

We just took a turf management short course put on by the U of A and U of Oklahoma, so keep in mind the info I'm about to give you is for our area.

Most species spend about 10 months in soil but some will remain 2-3 yrs.
Flights occur early May to mid June with egg laying following shortly after
Thresholds- May/June beetle, 3-5/sq ft
Japanese beetle, 8-10/sq ft
Masked Chafer, 8-10/sq ft
Black Turfgrass Ateanius, 30-50/sq ft

Preventative applications( May-July). Products used (Mach 2, Meridian, Merit Allectus, Arena, Aloft, Acelepryn, or Zylam.) Speciifc products not endorsed, only active ingredients.

Curative/Rescue applications.(until mid Sept- early Oct) Products used (Dylox, Sevin, Arena, Acelepryn) Again, only active ingredients are being endorsed.

If you are trying to control insects that have overwintered, I would apply the preventative earlier in the time frame given. This is the strategy I would personally use. If large grubs that are about to become adult beetles are not feeding they are also not causing damage and any eggs laid by adult beetles will be controlled as soon as they hatch and begin to feed. I would only use the curative/rescue products for actively feeding grubs to put an immediate stop to damage. Like I said, this is the approach I would take. Fortunately, we do not see much grub activity here. Last year was the worst I've seen in a long time. Mostly, because of the drought I think. I only had about a dozen cases out of hundreds of customers. Hope this helps.
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Last edited by ted putnam; 02-10-2013 at 01:49 PM.
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Old 02-10-2013, 01:59 PM
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ELS Landscape ELS Landscape is offline
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@ Ted, Well said. I suspect however as a preventive there are some better (safer) AI's to use. I chose not to use them or include them because of the cost. I may upsell these one day. I do not see grubs listed but mole crickets are and they are a risk too. The Mode of Action is the same.


http://certisusa.com/pdf-labels/Neemix45_label.pdf
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Old 02-10-2013, 02:58 PM
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fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELS Landscape View Post
Dylox is effective all the time and is not cost effective to use as a preventive IMHO. It is best as a rescue application because it is effective in all seasons as a contact killer.


Dig in the ground and find grubs before treating for them please!!!
Not Using dylox as a preventive has nothing to do with cost effectiveness. Dylox degrades rapidly after application, in high pH soil and or water it may be effectively useless inside of a day, it could be free and it still couldn't be used as a preventive application. For that you need residuals.
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Old 02-10-2013, 02:58 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is offline
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Thanks guys: Putting down Dylox in late fall gets most of them; getting them before they stir in spring is my game plan. Main reason for posting was to see how other parts of the country reason with grubs. Thanks Ted, it's always good to see your educated post. Those dates look so close to our coastal grub seasons as well. Grubs are as big of a problem as those May flies and black flies. I have to be covered up when working early in the morning. Thanks again.
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Old 02-10-2013, 03:06 PM
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fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
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Different region but this is a good basic read, same insects, same chemicals. Just adjust your timing.

http://extension.umass.edu/turf/fact...e-grub-control
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Old 02-10-2013, 03:09 PM
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ELS Landscape ELS Landscape is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fl-landscapes View Post
Not Using dylox as a preventive has nothing to do with cost effectiveness. Dylox degrades rapidly after application, in high pH soil and or water it may be effectively useless inside of a day, it could be free and it still couldn't be used as a preventive application. For that you need residuals.
That is also a good point but dylox is far from free and is more expensive than other products that do well as a preventative.
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Old 02-10-2013, 03:33 PM
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fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
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That is also a good point but dylox is far from free and is more expensive than other products that do well as a preventative.
And your point is? I was just wondering why you said dylox was too cost prohibitive for a preventive treatment, when cost has NOTHING to do with it because it simply isn't a preventive chemical. Especially after your condescending comment to the original poster to "please dig before you treat" .....carry on gents, I got some golf to watch.
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Old 02-10-2013, 03:44 PM
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ELS Landscape ELS Landscape is offline
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Originally Posted by fl-landscapes View Post
And your point is? I was just wondering why you said dylox was too cost prohibitive for a preventive treatment, when cost has NOTHING to do with it because it simply isn't a preventive chemical. Especially after your condescending comment to the original poster to "please dig before you treat" .....carry on gents, I got some golf to watch.
We could split hairs all day. With proper life cycle monitoring a good dose of Dylox would prevent the grubs from living.

Lighten up!

However, I think you should absolutely have a Target and an Action Level set well before releasing an organophosphate into the environment.
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