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  #1  
Old 02-07-2013, 09:07 PM
locallawncare.ca locallawncare.ca is online now
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Hand Winch for unloading leaves

OK so I recently got a used leaf loader and I am planning on building a leaf box on my trailer for the fall. Its a utility trailer with bi-fold ramps on the back. At the dump I go to I cannot hook the truck to anything to pull the debris out of the trailer.
So why question is will a hand crank bolted to the floor of the back of the trailer allow me to pull out debris with it hooked up to either a skid/tarp/other. I know it wont completely empty it but it would be better then using a pitch fork/rake like I did this year. There is literally nothing to hook to at the dump, Ive read the numerous posts on using a tree/truck/post/etc. Any input would greatly be appreciated. I work solo so this would be a big time/back saver.
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Old 02-07-2013, 09:34 PM
hi_speedreed hi_speedreed is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locallawncare.ca View Post
OK so I recently got a used leaf loader and I am planning on building a leaf box on my trailer for the fall. Its a utility trailer with bi-fold ramps on the back. At the dump I go to I cannot hook the truck to anything to pull the debris out of the trailer.
So why question is will a hand crank bolted to the floor of the back of the trailer allow me to pull out debris with it hooked up to either a skid/tarp/other. I know it wont completely empty it but it would be better then using a pitch fork/rake like I did this year. There is literally nothing to hook to at the dump, Ive read the numerous posts on using a tree/truck/post/etc. Any input would greatly be appreciated. I work solo so this would be a big time/back saver.
Gonna be hard work and expensive. A 2 ton hand crank winch is over $1k by comparison a 5 ton Warn winch powered by a 12v battery is $579. You might be able to bolt the winch to the underside of the trailer and fabricate a guide pulley on the end of the trailer to keep it from rubbing for full debris removal.
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Old 02-07-2013, 09:44 PM
hi_speedreed hi_speedreed is offline
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link to the hand winch

http://www.gilmorekramer.com/more_in..._winches.shtml

link to the Warn

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/wr...FdSLPAod5g8Agg
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  #4  
Old 02-08-2013, 01:48 AM
herler herler is online now
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Most of the guys who have a leaf vac trailer setup are using a dump trailer, or all the ones I've ever seen do.
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  #5  
Old 02-08-2013, 08:40 AM
jones68 jones68 is online now
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if you were pulling from the back of the trailer you would be pulling all the leafs right at yourself. i use a pitch fork myself and am looking at buying a dump trailer. i saw a youtube video on these things http://www.bushwinch.com.au/
pretty neat idea
a lot of times i think people spend more time and effort to find an "easier way" to do something when they could get the work done faster if they just did it
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:43 AM
Roger Roger is online now
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A few years ago, when I was hauling many trailer loads of leaves to the dump, I thought about this alot. I was forking everything out, blowing out what I could (no points for leaving a nice pile). I am no longer working this way, and have very few trips to the dump any longer. The ideas are dead.

My thoughts were to explore putting a boat winch on the tongue, threading a cable under the bed, over a pulley at the rear, then having the cables run along the top of the bed, attaching to a mobile end gate in the front. The end gate would need two pull points, so the split in the cable may have to be under the bed, with two pulleys at the rear. An alternative would be two winches in the front, with two cables under the bed, two pulleys at the rear, and two cables running to the two pull points on the end gate.

The end gate would be traveling on a skid board/timber, with the slower portion sloped to the rear, the vertical on the top portion of the gate. The gate needs to be stable, and also needs the front held down with debris, so it just does not tip.

My ideal would be to have a pipe (2" dia. ?) running across the rear, running through bushings at the side, and one in the middle. The pipe would act as a take-up spool for chains (or cables) running to the same end gate I mentioned above. One end of the pipe would have some fitting for a device to rotate the pipe, taking up the chains, and pulling the end gate toward the rear of the trailer.

We used this arrangement many years ago for silage trailers. This was before silage trailers had self-unloading mechanisms, with beaters and conveyers for the material out the side. The device to turn the pipe was very simple, but I never found one. It had either an electric motor, or small gasoline engine, a square stub (maybe 1.5X1.5") out of a transmission. The gear reduction inside the transmission was very significant, turning the stub at 2-5 rpm. The slow rotation of the pipe rolled up the chains, pulling the end gate to the rear of the trailer where we pulled off the material. It only needed a small motor (~1hp), and was a very simple scheme. Pulling off a trailer of leaves would be a breeze. We were moving 4T of silage on a 6X14 trailer.

This idea is not unlike the dumper system sold for small pickup beds -- crank in the rear, taking up the sheet laying on the bed, covered with the material to be unloaded. I cannot think of the name of this device right now.

Just some thoughts. Maybe something here will trigger an idea that you can implement.
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:02 AM
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TriCountyLawn TriCountyLawn is offline
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Subscribed, Just the other day I was looking at a cheap 16' utility trailer and was wondering if I could do something cheaper then a dump trailer for leaves and maybe mulch. Could get dump trailer a lil later down the line and it wouldn't be tied up during the leaf season.
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  #8  
Old 02-09-2013, 06:52 AM
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Richard Martin Richard Martin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hi_speedreed View Post
Gonna be hard work and expensive. A 2 ton hand crank winch is over $1k by comparison a 5 ton Warn winch powered by a 12v battery is $579.
Wow! When I read his post I was thinking something more along the lines of a $24.95 Come Along. Here's a 4 ton.



http://www.harborfreight.com/8000-lb...uller-543.html
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Old 02-09-2013, 01:01 PM
hi_speedreed hi_speedreed is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Wow! When I read his post I was thinking something more along the lines of a $24.95 Come Along. Here's a 4 ton.



http://www.harborfreight.com/8000-lb...uller-543.html
A come along is my first thought as well but the OP had specifically written hand crank winch. With the weight, and drag acting on that weight compounding it, I chose a worm geared model which is less likely to fail as opposed to a spur geared hank crank winch or come along. I have seen those cheap tools fail because as you know, they are cheap because they use cheap metal. In fact, the product you linked has multiple reviews stating failure. A come along is slow and cumbersome. It also takes more room to operate do to the ratcheting action of the arm.

I have always felt if you are going to buy a tool, you should buy one that will do the job with the smallest opportunity for failure. In this case the best tool would be a dump trailer. Since the OP wanted a way to dump a non dump trailer I would buy the best tool for the job. The best value appeared to be the 5 ton 12V winch. I really don't believe there is any practical application that will save the OP headache w/o causing more.

Another thing to remember is you are dragging completely dead weight. The force between the load and the floor of the trailer makes initial movement of the load more difficult than if the load was wheeled or tilted. This is known as static friction or stiction.
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Old 02-09-2013, 01:45 PM
Roger Roger is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Wow! When I read his post I was thinking something more along the lines of a $24.95 Come Along. Here's a 4 ton.


http://www.harborfreight.com/8000-lb...uller-543.html

Good idea, if one end has an anchor point. I think that was the OP's problem -- no anchor point.

That was my problem as well --nothing to use as a pull point. That is why my ideas centered around pulling against the trailer itself.
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