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  #11  
Old 02-14-2013, 10:45 AM
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Sprinkler Buddy Sprinkler Buddy is online now
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Sadly, few take water restrictions seriously until the well has run dry. Then the finger pointing will begin, it already has to a small degree. We have many products on the market that will help conserve water when it comes to our irrigation systems. This being known, yet few adopt these products due to cost or lack of enthusiasm to better their water conservation efforts. "It still works mentality". If we wait until it doesn't work, its going to be a rude awakening to many.
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  #12  
Old 02-14-2013, 07:53 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaMac View Post
Of course. I'm just trying to get a dialogue going concerning issues pertaining to the thread title, or items that we can do to correct bad practices in watering and landscaping, or how to solve issues of losing water. We can't fix the drought, but we can fix badly installed systems.
So do you think people in your area are really ready to take water conservation seriously or do they still want that upscale landscaped look ?
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  #13  
Old 02-14-2013, 08:15 PM
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irritation irritation is offline
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I would say if my customers could only water twice a week, about 90% would say screw it and water the plants with a hose.
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  #14  
Old 02-15-2013, 10:09 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
So do you think people in your area are really ready to take water conservation seriously or do they still want that upscale landscaped look ?
I might note, one can have an "upscale" landscape that is also not a high water consumer.
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  #15  
Old 02-15-2013, 12:21 PM
SoCalLandscapeMgmt SoCalLandscapeMgmt is offline
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Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
I might note, one can have an "upscale" landscape that is also not a high water consumer.
Yep..... the landscaping that I see around the big homes in Santa Barbara and Montecito come to mind. Very nicely done and they use very little water.
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  #16  
Old 02-15-2013, 05:53 PM
Weekend cut easymoney Weekend cut easymoney is online now
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Installing drip can go a long way at saving water ...lush or otherwise, its about responsible watering...too many guys blow water across the landscape and think they have done their part as the plants all get wet....

....changing the publics thinking on watering is important also...too many folks want the cheapest system and not the most effecient system as they think spending the extra money up front is wasted..

many folks think repair entails checking the system only when the water bill goes way up or they have dead plants...further, they add heads wherever they want plants, reguardless of any concerns about haudrqulics, coverage or hydrozoning.

I'm constantly amazed to see large properties which do not have monthly irrigation checks require d in maintenance agreements.
We ran into one where the community had been fined by the city for not repairing several main line breaks...the board did not see the immediate needmto repair...it took them 6 months to repair...when i ask3d them if they had regular irrigation checks performed, they told me "sure, our guy fixes things when we see broken heads...we just call and tell him".
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Last edited by Weekend cut easymoney; 02-15-2013 at 06:00 PM.
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  #17  
Old 02-16-2013, 08:17 AM
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DanaMac DanaMac is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
So do you think people in your area are really ready to take water conservation seriously or do they still want that upscale landscaped look ?
No, I don't think they are ready to really embrace the issue. They will when they get their water bill though. We have already been on a tiered system, but they are talking about severe penalties for going over 2,000 cubic feet per month, or 14,960 gallons. And with some of the bigger lawns, or inefficient systems, that will happen. At least the utility system is going to update their website, so they can monitor usage at their account.

I am going to suggest keeping the very front of the house green, and allow the rest to be less green. Many of these folks have kids that are now gone, and the lawn doesn't get used anyway, other than for looks and for upkeep. Not everybody is going to be able to cut their lawn size by 50% or change the entire landscaping. Retirees, multiple kids, current economy, laziness - are all reasons they won't do it. When water and sod were cheap, it was grass from edge to edge of the properties, and some people just won't budge even when they have to.

One issue I have, is that with the possible restrictions, and overall water shortage, our city/county is still (at this time anyway) allowing fracking (hydraulic fracturing for natural gas) which uses millions of gallons of fresh water. I'm not a proponent of it to begin with, but this makes it even worse.
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  #18  
Old 02-16-2013, 08:39 AM
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greenmonster304 greenmonster304 is online now
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Speaking of saving water I went to a class put on by toro/Irritrol about their precision line of products. It was all very interesting. They showed how the precision nozzles work and how the DU is much higher than Traditional nozzles and how that helps save up to 30% of water. Most of the class was geared toward how to upsell this stuff to customers by showing how much money they will save. But how can I sell this to the people in my area where many have wells, water costs $1.58 per thousand, and they are multi millionaires? There is no insentive to upgrade a crappy system.
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  #19  
Old 02-16-2013, 08:50 AM
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DanaMac DanaMac is online now
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Originally Posted by greenmonster304 View Post
Speaking of saving water I went to a class put on by toro/Irritrol about their precision line of products. It was all very interesting. They showed how the precision nozzles work and how the DU is much higher than Traditional nozzles and how that helps save up to 30% of water. Most of the class was geared toward how to upsell this stuff to customers by showing how much money they will save. But how can I sell this to the people in my area where many have wells, water costs $1.58 per thousand, and they are multi millionaires? There is no insentive to upgrade a crappy system.
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We bought maybe a thousand or two of the Precision nozzles last year. I like them a lot. Great for redesigns, or zones that are stretched beyond their available GPM. Great coverage. We had one system where we changed out all of the nozzles to the Precisions, and the pressure at the heads was then so great, that we had to re-wire to run two zones at a time. Heads were not PRS. It caused a lot of water hammer without doubling up the zones as well. So watch out when converting older systems.
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  #20  
Old 02-16-2013, 08:54 AM
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greenmonster304 greenmonster304 is online now
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I have used them for the same reason as you and I like them alot too. But what they claim is that even though they use 30% less water you can leave the run times the same because the du is so much better it makes it up.
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