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Old 06-18-2015, 01:04 PM
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ToddH ToddH is offline
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Location: Grand Prairie, Texas
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Velke Hydro 32" and 32" stander

I purchased the following earlier this season

Wright 32" Stander - It absolutely can not jump a curb, no way no how.

Wright 52" Stander

Wright 61" Stander

and the Velke Hydro 32"

Overall good machines that should last.

The 32" stander can not jump a curb which really is horrible because the small islands in many commercial properties.

The 32" WB can jump a curb but the machine is extremely heavy. One of my long term employees that regularly used a 36" Lesco refused to operate this machine if he had to jump curbs with it. We had the Lesco for 10 years and it was time to upgrade but I am about to regret letting it go.

It is nice to see a strong well built machine but perhaps some overkill on the 32" WB as is weighs far more than the Lesco 36". It lasted over 10 years with daily use.

The 32" WB also has some super small tires on it. I have asked the dealer the distributor and Wright about the possibility of some wider tires, even if it makes the mower 34" wide. No one has a solution but my feeling is those tires are not big enough to reduce the weight on the turf.

There seems to be some clearance for wider tires. Maybe I can get an answer here on the tires.
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:37 PM
WrightCommercial WrightCommercial is offline
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ToddH,
32" mowers are tough because they weight almost the same as a 36" version because the majority of the components are common. Curb height will definitely limit the mowers curbing ability the taller they get, how are you currently trying to jump the curb? The 18x6.50-8 assemblies off a 36" walk behind can be mounted on the 32" but the motor supports will have to be changed to the larger deck size motor supports for them to fit and the HP hoses would need to be rerouted outside the body instead of thru the body.
Best Regards,
Wright Mfg.
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:54 PM
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ToddH ToddH is offline
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Exactly, the 32 weighs almost the same as the 36 but has so much less tire width that it is an issue. Almost so much of an issue the mower is not usable as it is tearing up yards. I bought the machine sight unseen as there seemed to be only one available. I bought it based on product reputation, I do not think I should have to re-engineer the machine and change out parts.

We are not able to jump curbs with the 32 stander period.... which is a major disappointment and lowers the utility of the machine. We have tried forward and reverse.
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Old 06-19-2015, 02:20 PM
WrightCommercial WrightCommercial is offline
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ToddH,
The majority of the 32" Standers are bought for backyard gates and Texas does seem to be a hot bed for that size Stander. The stock air pressure makes for a firm tire so lowering pressures can help with the tear but the wider tire is truly the best option. When you are trying to get it over the curb are you driving it over or popping a wheelie to get over the curb initially.
Best Regards,
Wright Mfg,
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Old 06-22-2015, 08:27 AM
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ToddH ToddH is offline
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First thing we did is set the tire pressure to the lowest setting in the specified range - IIRCC around 15 PSI

We tried forward and backwards as well as with a wood block near the curb. We tried to pop a wheelie but it still got hung up and seemed like a good way to damage the machine.

We did not try to raise the deck. The mower is too heavy to adjust the deck without having the wheel up on the side of the ramp or a curb. So every time you get on a banana island, and having to try the move the deck up and down on each one would be more trouble than just mowing with a 21" mower.

The dealer also tried to jump the curb at their shop.

Regarding the tires.

Granted it has been very wet in Texas, but I can see already that the wider tire is a must even in ideal conditions. How do we go about getting this done? Otherwise the mower is pretty much useless as I can not afford to lose clients over rutted yards.

Again, I have an operator that has used a Lesco 36" for 10 years and has used other walk behinds prior to joining me. He can not get it not to tear yards.
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Old 07-02-2015, 01:21 PM
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ToddH ToddH is offline
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Still wondering


Happy 4th
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  #7  
Old 07-07-2015, 08:38 AM
olde_blue olde_blue is offline
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32" and 36" Standers can climb stairs

I own both a 36" and 32" fixed deck Stander, and agree that the narrow tires on the 32" make it hard on all but the firmest driest lawns. I got a good deal on the 32" and keep it as a backup, planning on swapping out the deck and wheels on the 36" when it wears out. The 36", with 8.5" wide tires at 8 psi, has acceptable flotation, but you still need to be gentle on turns in soft turf, mainly due to the narrow track.

Looking at my machines and the parts manual, you should be able to run 8.5" wide tires just by swapping out your wheels for the wider (8") wheels. They are also used on the large frame Standers, and appear to be zero offset. If you hunt around, a set of tires and wheels could run as little as $200 for non-oem wheels and Turfmasters.

About jumping the curb: I move my 36" Stander up 3 stairs (about 18-20" in height change) using a plywood seesaw. You need a 36" by 96" piece of 3/4" plywood. Place the center of the plywood at the top of the curb or stairs, the center slightly offset so that the plywood slants towards the approach side. Drive the Stander as slowly as traction allows up the ramp. As you reach the balance point, the plywood seesaws, keeping the deck from scraping the curb. You effectively have two 48" ramps, joined in the middle. Unfortunately, the plywood is heavy. A shorter ramp will not work, because you need to have the front and rear wheels on one half of the ramp at the same time, or else your seesaw will pop up under the deck.

If you have lots of space around the curb, I'd try a 24" x 36" piece of plywood set up as a conventional ramp or seesaw, and pop a wheelie going over it. It would be lighter and easier to move about.
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Old 07-07-2015, 09:09 AM
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ToddH ToddH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olde_blue View Post
I own both a 36" and 32" fixed deck Stander, and agree that the narrow tires on the 32" make it hard on all but the firmest driest lawns. I got a good deal on the 32" and keep it as a backup, planning on swapping out the deck and wheels on the 36" when it wears out. The 36", with 8.5" wide tires at 8 psi, has acceptable flotation, but you still need to be gentle on turns in soft turf, mainly due to the narrow track.

Looking at my machines and the parts manual, you should be able to run 8.5" wide tires just by swapping out your wheels for the wider (8") wheels. They are also used on the large frame Standers, and appear to be zero offset. If you hunt around, a set of tires and wheels could run as little as $200 for non-oem wheels and Turfmasters.

About jumping the curb: I move my 36" Stander up 3 stairs (about 18-20" in height change) using a plywood seesaw. You need a 36" by 96" piece of 3/4" plywood. Place the center of the plywood at the top of the curb or stairs, the center slightly offset so that the plywood slants towards the approach side. Drive the Stander as slowly as traction allows up the ramp. As you reach the balance point, the plywood seesaws, keeping the deck from scraping the curb. You effectively have two 48" ramps, joined in the middle. Unfortunately, the plywood is heavy. A shorter ramp will not work, because you need to have the front and rear wheels on one half of the ramp at the same time, or else your seesaw will pop up under the deck.

If you have lots of space around the curb, I'd try a 24" x 36" piece of plywood set up as a conventional ramp or seesaw, and pop a wheelie going over it. It would be lighter and easier to move about.
Using a ramp is not ideal when looking at a parking lot islands.

The WB is a new machine. I bought it sight unseen based on the reputation of Wright and by looking at their larger machines. I really don't think I should modify it.

I may chalk it up as a bad decision and move on to something else next year. The machine is way over built for a 32, far too heavy with too small of tires on it.

The Lesco 36 weight is about 100 pounds less, we owned it for 10 years and used it and sometimes abused it.

Thanks for the feed back.
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