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Old 03-12-2013, 03:48 PM
clayslandscape clayslandscape is offline
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Arborvitae Tips

I have manage an apartment complex and they called today wanting ideas of what to do with he overgrown arborvitaes at the entrance to each building.

Would it be ok to cut these back considerably and they will come back or should I just get rid of them and plant something else back? If I were to plant something back, what would you replace them with?

Thank you guys!
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Old 03-12-2013, 03:53 PM
clayslandscape clayslandscape is offline
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Sorry forgot the picture
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:07 PM
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How do you get them to grow upside down?
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:43 PM
clayslandscape clayslandscape is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandview (2006) View Post
How do you get them to grow upside down?
That's a trick I have learned.


Sorry about that
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:55 PM
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They are cooked, pull them out and put new ones in.
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:16 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Those types of arbs are meant to grow tall and soften the appearance of larger structures... But all aesthetics are opinion so do what the client wants... to me they look like they're finally getting to the right size, but may be topped if they begin to block the upstairs(or downstairs) window as the case may be...
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:20 PM
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:12 PM
New2TheGreenIndustry New2TheGreenIndustry is offline
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You can't hard prune a conifer. If they don't like the size, time to rip them out.
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Old 03-13-2013, 07:48 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Arborvitaes(cedar Family) are one of the most prunable plants in any landscape... Pines less so, but you should see what the pruners along high wires do to mature pine trees...

You can say what you like about those cypress things in the South, but those cylindrical arbs pictured are definately prunable, cut them down to anysize you want, as long as there is still greenery it will grow from that greenery, with no noticeable side effects...

If there is side pruning into the leafless interior branches, it is very likely that, those areas will not green up again, but even there, you do not have to leave much greenery to keep the shrub going... be advised that they are very slow growing trees, so do a good job pruning...
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Old 03-13-2013, 08:29 AM
New2TheGreenIndustry New2TheGreenIndustry is offline
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Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Arborvitaes(cedar Family) are one of the most prunable plants in any landscape... Pines less so, but you should see what the pruners along high wires do to mature pine trees...

You can say what you like about those cypress things in the South, but those cylindrical arbs pictured are definately prunable, cut them down to anysize you want, as long as there is still greenery it will grow from that greenery, with no noticeable side effects...

If there is side pruning into the leafless interior branches, it is very likely that, those areas will not green up again, but even there, you do not have to leave much greenery to keep the shrub going... be advised that they are very slow growing trees, so do a good job pruning...
This is the key. Though, I'd be very weary of pruning the terminals out of the leader branches. You would continue to have growth on the side but not the top. Maybe I'm wrong, but I wouldn't even attempt it.
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