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  #1  
Old 08-14-2008, 05:47 PM
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Discussion On Other Forum

There has been discussion about this on some of our other forums, particularly LawnSite.... I am curious as to what people who are experts in this industry have to say....
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  #2  
Old 09-09-2008, 07:13 PM
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I am very involved with planting, again, because so many mature trees have been lost in my area.

I just bought the hydraulic tree ball (b and b) squeezer you see in nurseries on skid steers to my mini skid (Dingo) and will get it Sat. in time for upcoming planting season. I love to spend hours hand picking trees for clients.
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Old 09-10-2008, 09:35 AM
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Awesome! I am sure I know what you will be doing on Saturday....
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  #4  
Old 09-14-2008, 12:23 AM
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we plan on planting a bit at our shops property. about 5 1/2 acres of it is completely open.

Just haven't figured out what we are going to plant yet. Got an idea if we are able to purchase an adjoining acre and a half what we will plant there.
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Old 09-14-2008, 12:32 AM
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Love to hear your plan and see some pict. Also, I am new as everyone, but welcome.
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  #6  
Old 09-28-2008, 02:46 PM
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growing trees

I for one am tired of seeing homeowners (and developers) removing native trees "they" consider to be 'junk'. "If it's not an oak or a maple, cut it down & replant".

I've seen 100 year old cottonwoods, basswoods, and red oaks in good health bulldozed down. Then there's the guy who's only mature trees are mulberries or boxelder trees, or black cherries, silver maples, etc, etc who has them cut down....then tries to start over by planting non-native trees...then having to wait 40 - 60 years to attain what he already removed. To me, this makes no sense -- especially when native trees often have fewer pest & stress probs, and typically outlive the "new" trees that replace them.

This pic is a commercial property up for sale across the street from my home. It has been for sale over 3 years now. 2 years ago, there were 8 very large trees marked for destruction (pink ribbons around the trunks). Note the elm tree with no bark (on the left) --- It was NOT marked for removal, but the large cottonwoods (right) WERE marked for removal. I notified our county zoning...come to find out, the developer was violating zoning laws. I also pointed out that a redtail hawk nest was in the top of one of these trees.

Odd to me is the fact that people pay high dollar for a "wooded lot"...then cut 'em down??? Ironic.

Not sure if a post like this qualifies in the catoegory of "growing trees". Maybe a "save our trees" forum should be started? my 2 cents
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  #7  
Old 09-28-2008, 03:01 PM
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I wil post some pics later of the few nice size trees we have at the property.

They do not look in to good of shape though.
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  #8  
Old 09-28-2008, 03:17 PM
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sounds good

My wife has an uncle who owns a construction company in Council Bluffs, IA. They specialize in exclusive homes with native lots. They always attempt to keep as many native trees as possible, and their projects bring premium money compared to all competitors.

I think there should be a forum regarding "saving/protecting" trees. IMO
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  #9  
Old 09-28-2008, 05:01 PM
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I like the way you think. Exotic trees are pathogen magnets, borers especially.
If you do get the native tree lot, care obviously should be observed protecting the trunks from damage and the roots from over backfill and damage and compaction and building related chemicals.
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  #10  
Old 09-29-2008, 08:19 AM
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Also, Amer. Lawn, the dead tree in the pict. is likely an american elm because of structure and appearance of bacterial wetwood (slime flux) (light colored bark) and the fact that it likely died from Dutch Elm Disease. This leaves other elms in the area vulnerable to the disease from airborne transmission or beetle flight that are/have been breeding in it. This tree should have been ordered removed by the city instead of leaving it for so long (no bark).
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