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  #1  
Old 10-24-2008, 08:52 PM
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Climbing systems

I haven't seen anyone talking about climbing systems they use yet. Lets start with systems used on pruning, including tree access and working the tree. Pictures and/or diagrams are always a help. Lists of tools and equipment needed should also be included for the benifit of all. Oh dont forget any little tricks you might have to make life easyer.
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  #2  
Old 10-29-2008, 02:24 PM
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Well no responses.

I use a split tail system - Blakes with a micro pulley

Anyone use a VT here?

Interested to here some feed back on it.

Mike
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  #3  
Old 10-29-2008, 06:15 PM
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VT is great. I use a modification learned at a Mark Chismom class. It is very tempermental though. Length, number of wraps, and type of cordage used, and its capatibility with the main climbing line all play a key role in how responsive the knot is. I use the micro mouse pully with mine so that I have one attachment point to my saddle and both lines stay tight. And the knot stays up in front of you instead of falling down between you legs. YOu have to be careful with the upper biner though it catches the top of the knot sometimes and it does not hold:eek: I combat that problem with a geko biner on top. The knot doesnt get inside it. :laugh:
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  #4  
Old 10-29-2008, 11:27 PM
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Any pictures have a pretty good idea in my head or at least I think I do but a pic. would help.

Any other systems.

Thanks,
Mike
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  #5  
Old 10-30-2008, 05:38 PM
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I have been trying to get pics of several systems I would like to share... But I have been tooooo busy. Recent storms have loaded me up with work. And I guess the ressesion hasnt got here yet because people are still calling to get their trees taken care of. (food for the week or my tree in the front yard????????) I will be doing crane work this weekend and will have my part time photographer (wife) on site taking pics. Hope to have a few pics sunday or monday.
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  #6  
Old 10-30-2008, 11:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingsquirrel View Post
I have been trying to get pics of several systems I would like to share... But I have been tooooo busy. Recent storms have loaded me up with work. And I guess the ressesion hasnt got here yet because people are still calling to get their trees taken care of. (food for the week or my tree in the front yard????????) I will be doing crane work this weekend and will have my part time photographer (wife) on site taking pics. Hope to have a few pics sunday or monday.
Will be looking foward to see those. Glad to here work is moving strong there. It has been slow here in Sonoma County, we have some rain coming in but no wind so I don't think too much storm work will come about. It has been enough to pay the bills but barely.
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  #7  
Old 10-31-2008, 09:36 PM
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I have been a bit busy, but I did notice your thread. I guess I started out with what I would consider a TRADITIONAL climbing system. Double rope, or commonly refered to as DbRT. This system is the least equipment intensive system, which can be as simple as a rope and a carabiner. I was taught the Blakes hitch for my friction knot, and have used a wide range of knots to attach my 'biner to my saddle. If you own, or have to purchase your own equipment, you probably won't take long in incorperating a cambium or friction saver. This simple device not only reduces the damage of the rope on the tree crotch, BUT significantly reduces wear on your rope. If you are pruning trees it is nessessary to protect the tree from rope abrassion. The drawback of the friction saver is the time involved in installing it in the target crotch.

Once you have been in the tree climbing game a while, some people adopt the more efficient, but newer method of climbing called Single Rope technique, OR SRT for short. This system is more involved as far as equipment, but for old farts like me, the efficiency is worth tha added investment. The true SRT system requires the climber to switch over to a dynamic system once they have reached the place in the tree they need to work. The reason for this is that there is NO way to decend on their line. I have adopted a version of the SRT system called RAD (Rope Access and Decent). One of the issues that needs to be reconized is that by anchoring the climbing line to tha base of the tree, it CAN double the weight at the target crotch. The reason we anchor to the base of the tree is that it can be used as a rescue option IF the climber gets into trouble. Some of the advantages of the SRT system is that you don't have to be great at isolating your climbing line, and there is NO need to install a friction saver. The ratio of climbing gain is 1:1, unlike the DbRT system of 2:1. The drawbacks are the stress at the crotch, and the use of mechanical devices. SRT is really in its infancy in the tree working world. The system I use is as follows. Rope, 1 toothed assender, a Petzl Gri-Gri, 1 Petzl stop, 3 tri-act carabiners, and finally a couple 6 foot lengths of prusik cord. Sorry I don't have any pictures on this computer, If anyone NEEDS to see the system, just PM me, and I will forward photos or video to them.

If you really want to get fancy, there are now Hybrid systems out there. The winner of the Masters Challenge at our TCC, and our representative to the ISA ITCC, was using this system. As you can see, it is fairly elaborate, and should only be used by experienced climbers, with a through knowledge of knots and hitches. The beauty of this system is that the climber is climbing on a static system, and at any time they can lock off the static system and work of the dynamic system.

For the NEWBIES out there reading this, Climbing can be a dangerous undertaking, and I will not be held responsible for any injury from an accident resulting from reading this post. Please find yourself a experienced mentor, or better yet, find a Qualified trainer to get you started.
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  #8  
Old 11-01-2008, 12:42 PM
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I should also add that in any of the three systems there ARE numerous variations of gear. My previous post is just the basic theory on each method. There are literally thousands of posts on the net about each.

The tree care industry is often reluctant to change, and of course there are regulations which are supposed to be adhered to. One thought that I had after last posting is that each individual situation might require a different climbing system. Complacency is what gets people hurt, keep an open mind to new ideas, and if you climb in your later years of life, the NEW methods may keep you doing it longer.:dancing:
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  #9  
Old 11-01-2008, 06:27 PM
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I find that a simple DdRt is usually the simplest fastest way to get things done. I've learned several of the SRT techniques over the last few years and while they are very beneficial in certain situations, more often than not I can be up a tree and already working on a classic setup long before I'm even ready to climb on SRT. Its very gear intensive and therefore expensive plus you have that much more stuff to keep track of/ pack around. Keep in mind that I live in an area where our largest trees are just over 100' tall and I spend most days working in trees 50' and under. In areas where big trees are the every day norm I can see SRT being much more advantageous. But only as an access tool. Working off an SRT system is more hassle than its worth. A plain old DdRT system with an efficient smooth hitch ( I use a VT) is much faster and easier to work with.
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  #10  
Old 11-03-2008, 10:07 PM
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old school simple, rope over with a tail and blakes hitch. arborplex and a clip, with a standard saddle. one of my other climbers has all the toys and gear, he is still slower!!!
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