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  #31  
Old 11-10-2008, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by treevet View Post

It ain't gonna last much through the winter tho.
You don't think? I am thinking that we are having to wait on the prune jobs that we would typically be doing right now (while the sap is low) and focusing on this mess. I am hoping that we can schedule the prune jobs for the winter months (while the sap is REAL low) and be working until Feb. or Mar.???
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  #32  
Old 11-10-2008, 02:51 PM
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I could have worded that better TGT. I think (hope) it will last thru the winter but by then it should be about thru. Lot of tree co.s out there, ours included, working 6 day weeks knocking it out daily.

What do you mean by the "sap is low?" or "real low"?

Thanks
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  #33  
Old 11-10-2008, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by treevet View Post

What do you mean by the "sap is low?" or "real low"?

Thanks
Doesn't the sap go down the tree in the winter and raise back up the tree in spring. I have an old-skool Arborist on my team now (you may know Mike Anderson) who tells me that he love to prune in the winter because the tree comes back nice the next season with less sap damage.
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  #34  
Old 11-10-2008, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Team Green Trees View Post
Doesn't the sap go down the tree in the winter and raise back up the tree in spring. I have an old-skool Arborist on my team now (you may know Mike Anderson) who tells me that he love to prune in the winter because the tree comes back nice the next season with less sap damage.
No, but the metabolism (life functions) of the tree slow down substantially. Nothing wrong with pruning in the winter.

Don't know Mike. You guys need to get connected with the ISA. Search "Trees are Good". Sap damage is not a valid concept. No offense meant really. Just trying to help. :waving:

You think those Bungles gonna go 8 and 0 like they are trying to get the fans to buy into. (:nono: way) :D
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  #35  
Old 11-10-2008, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by treevet View Post
"Trees are Good". Sap damage is not a valid concept.

You think those Bungles gonna go 8 and 0 like they are trying to get the fans to buy into. (:nono: way) :D
"Sap Damage" was a poorly stated term. I hadn't a clue why Mike said that he like to prune in the winter, I just knew that he did. I don't do any cutting. I am just a business owner. I will get up there and cut when asked and I sell ALL the work, but I try not to be in the way too awful much. Landscaping is my forte.

Bengals...who ARE dey?
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  #36  
Old 11-11-2008, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by treevet View Post
When you've been in the bus. for a while you will know what a routine (easy) crane removal is FS. No offense. Everything seems like a big deal early on.
Four hours arrival to departure makes my point. Still say your set up is way too busy and borderline obsessive compulsive. 2 chokes on every pick as well. Excuse me if it is a little amusing.

You're doing a good job tho. Keep up the good work.
FYI-I have been in the buis for nearly 11 years now. I know not as long as you, but there arent many, your age, still in the buis. The first 7.5 years of that 11 was spent with or on a crane. Ive seen many difficult removals, many easyer ones, but I still DO NOT consider crane work routine. Routine to me = what I call smash and dash. Routine = Complacency (sp). Complacency gets people hurt. But I guess youve been in long enough you know everything. Well Ill let that go before I piss someone off.

On to double choking... For all of those who dont know everything... My reasoning... What happens if one sling breaks... You are likely dead... I had one sling break once... Guess what saved my ass... The other. Another question... What happens if one choke point breaks... either the other one follows or the crane gets shock loaded (by the way shock loading crane = reallllllllllly bad)... Also had several rigging points fail (yes my mistake) in one instance a lilac bit the dust. In another I almost bit it. Double choke and spread them when you can, sh*t happens you dont want to die.

If Obsessive compulsive = taking my time so that I have time later. I guess you are right. But Im not going to die in a tree.
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  #37  
Old 08-10-2012, 08:46 PM
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I use split tails. Just easier when you need to constantly connect and disconnect from the tree to get your rope around different branches. I use a bee line single splice and I use blakes hitch. Easiest and can use it for ascending or descending. Sometimes I use double spliced bee line and I used the klemheist or any version of prusik knot. One safety snap, one carabiner(s. If you have the time though, I use the blakes hitch without the second carabiner, (SRT) just because I find when descending using DRT it twists my rope on the way down and I got to spend time unwinding it.
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  #38  
Old 08-10-2012, 08:50 PM
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they gave us this site at school and it's pretty good, shows you animated step by steps on how to tie and such.
Knots by Grog:
http://www.animatedknots.com/indexcl...matedknots.com
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  #39  
Old 08-11-2012, 09:12 AM
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Wow its been a couple years since I started this thread. Looking back I have changed things up a ton in the last 4 years.

Lucky, that is a great system to work off. I worked off it for years, I even find myself going back to it as a second tie in every now and again.
Do you store your rope in a bag or do you coil? Only reason I ask is sometimes coiling (depending on the direction of coil) can work against your blakes (which twists the opposite direction) and cause a serious twist problem. I found the VT does the same thing. Because the blakes and VT wrap all in the same direction when tied so they put kind of a cork screw effect on the rope.
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  #40  
Old 08-13-2012, 04:35 PM
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coil

ya I coil but I have been debating getting a bag because it remains untwisted. I was always taught to coil it up but I know what you mean by working against the knot. You may very well be right as to why the twisting of the rope occurs. It's just more money to spend but then again, being a company I can get tax write offs for equipment and such. :)
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