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Old 04-05-2013, 07:18 AM
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wildstarblazer wildstarblazer is offline
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planting sod over hard soil

I have a job that has really hard soil. Hardpan I guess you can call it. I don't know how it got that way but when I tried to plant some bushes it was like trying to go through concrete. So I had to raise the soil and plant in it as you see in the picture. Most of the soil around here is sandy with more clay about a foot or two below.

In the fore ground they want sod planted, about 2 or 3 pallets worth's area that you can't see in the picture.

Question, what can I do to break up the soil and make it good enough to plant sod?
Thanks for any help..
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:01 AM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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Till it up and then put top soil over it
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:48 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
Till it up and then put top soil over it
Why? Test the soil, add any needed amendments, till as deep as you can.
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:54 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Definately till in some compost and even larger particle sand... this looks like Limestone Fines, from the picture... if it is like that, you may very well want to remove some of it and bring in new dirt... I have never tried to overcome limestone fines with compost... but we have used it to stablize ditches, driveways, stones, and such...

Do you know what kind of structure you have with that stuff??? our fines seem to create a 'platy' structure, much like clay,,, only worse...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:54 AM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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He said it's hard and looks like solid clay to me.

Either way defiantly put two inches of topsoil down.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:06 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
He said it's hard and looks like solid clay to me
You say it looks like clay .... I think it looks like sand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
Either way defiantly put two inches of topsoil down.
Again, why?
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:21 AM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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Always have put down topsoil. Wether for seed or sod. I feel it helps the sod roots grow ahold better.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:26 AM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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Kiril is right, and you just said it was sandy. If it were clay you should see big cracks when its dry, and sharp clumps, if dug up. Heavy sprinkling should make it soft. If you can grow weeds and trees you can grow grass, (provided there is sun and moisture). Soil test, till, lay sod.
Do not add sand to clay soil, as it makes the result even more hard. The clay fills the pores between the sand granules--becomes more dense.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:32 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by whiffyspark View Post
Always have put down topsoil. Wether for seed or sod. I feel it helps the sod roots grow ahold better.
Again, why? Tilling will be more than adequate to prepare any soil for seed or sod. Further, adding topsoil without properly preparing the soil on site will generally lead to more problems than not.
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:33 AM
whiffyspark whiffyspark is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
Kiril is right, and you just said it was sandy. If it were clay you should see big cracks when its dry, and sharp clumps, if dug up. Heavy sprinkling should make it soft. If you can grow weeds and trees you can grow grass, (provided there is sun and moisture). Soil test, till, lay sod.
Do not add sand to clay soil, as it makes the result even more hard. The clay fills the pores between the sand granules--becomes more dense.
I said it looked like solid clay.

But for future references would you recommend putting topsoil on clay? I deal with alot of clay in my area. Topsoil is somewhat expensive, so it's cost me some bids
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