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  #11  
Old 04-09-2013, 10:45 PM
Bigred350 Bigred350 is offline
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Why are you worrying about pressure/flow and booster pump if your paying someone else to Install the system. Just let them worry about it. If the system don't work then don't pay them until it works.
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2013, 03:25 AM
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mitchgo mitchgo is offline
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Why are you worrying about pressure/flow and booster pump if your paying someone else to Install the system. Just let them worry about it. If the system don't work then don't pay them until it works.
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It's called being a knowledgeable homeowner. Can you handle the test of there questions being thrown at yah?

#1 rule for this of course is you have to raise your price some due to the amount of time there going to slow your ass down.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2013, 03:31 AM
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mitchgo mitchgo is offline
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Anyway, my municipal supply varies all over the place. Current readings are 42-45 psi statically, but last summer they were around 60. I am having the city look into this, but no success yet.
Where are you getting your pressure readings? Off the hose bib?

It's EXTREMEMLY rare to have that drastic of a pressure difference in one year from the city. Considering most systems are gravity supplied or pumps with prv's.

If your neighbors lawn are lushes green through out the summer as you say.. Seems pressure isn't the issue for them unless they all have amazing systems designed accordingly to low pressure which I highly doubt.

Infact you probably just having a failing Pressure Reducing Valve inside your house or on your service line.

Call your water district and ask for the streets water pressure.. or test your neighbors pressure on there irrigation system.. Or pay someone for an hour of there time to test your pressure at your meter.
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  #14  
Old 04-10-2013, 11:09 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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It's called being a knowledgeable homeowner.
I would also call it being a smart and responsible homeowner. Given the plethora of shitting contractors that don't know their head from their ass and think their crappy work is "grade A", why would anyone NOT do their homework.
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  #15  
Old 04-10-2013, 11:43 AM
goodmatt78 goodmatt78 is offline
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Where are you getting your pressure readings? Off the hose bib?

It's EXTREMEMLY rare to have that drastic of a pressure difference in one year from the city. Considering most systems are gravity supplied or pumps with prv's.

If your neighbors lawn are lushes green through out the summer as you say.. Seems pressure isn't the issue for them unless they all have amazing systems designed accordingly to low pressure which I highly doubt.

Infact you probably just having a failing Pressure Reducing Valve inside your house or on your service line.

Call your water district and ask for the streets water pressure.. or test your neighbors pressure on there irrigation system.. Or pay someone for an hour of there time to test your pressure at your meter.
City has gauges on several hydrants and one is on the edge of my property. Readings are identical to my gauge on a hose bib.
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  #16  
Old 04-10-2013, 11:52 AM
goodmatt78 goodmatt78 is offline
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I would also call it being a smart and responsible homeowner. Given the plethora of shitting contractors that don't know their head from their ass and think their crappy work is "grade A", why would anyone NOT do their homework.
Thank you and I understand this is kinda a catch 22. My engineering degree doesn't help my thought process. I always have the general thought that if I am paying someone for work, then they should be able to do as good of a job or better than myself. Unfortunately, I have been burned on several occasions on this. I have no problem paying for extra equipment up front, but after the fact or for a fix doesn't sit well. Good contractors are out there, but not always easy to find or sort out.
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  #17  
Old 04-10-2013, 12:14 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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I always have the general thought that if I am paying someone for work, then they should be able to do as good of a job or better than myself.
I completely understand, however if you are even half as anal as I am, expecting contractors to perform to the same standards as you place upon yourself will result in you doing the job because no one will work for you. I don't expect anyone to work to my standards, however I do expect contractors to produce industry standard work or better .... and not their own "industry standards" that are set by their crappy work and their fly-by-night hacker piers .


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Unfortunately, I have been burned on several occasions on this.
As have I, mostly because I didn't babysit them, which I shouldn't have too.

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Originally Posted by goodmatt78 View Post
I have no problem paying for extra equipment up front, but after the fact or for a fix doesn't sit well. Good contractors are out there, but not always easy to find or sort out.
The only way you are going to be comfortable here is to collect some data on pressure fluctuations over time. That said, unless you have a flow and pressure gauge that can be connected to a data logger you are dead in the water or left doing it manually. Water pressure will vary throughout the day and throughout the year simply due to neighborhood usage patterns. If you have a comprehensive design that is properly hydrozoned, then build a potential schedule so you can narrow down the amount of time you will need to irrigate. Once you know that, you can monitor the pressure during your irrigation window. That said, your best irrigation window is early morning (~3-10 AM) so I hope you are an early riser.

Also, it is not impossible, or even difficult, to design a system with low static pressure, however you will need more zones.
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  #18  
Old 04-10-2013, 02:05 PM
Bigred350 Bigred350 is offline
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I would also call it being a smart and responsible homeowner. Given the plethora of shitting contractors that don't know their head from their ass and think their crappy work is "grade A", why would anyone NOT do their homework.

I would be asking the brand and type of heads, valves, pipe class and size, what type of wire, controller.........
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  #19  
Old 04-10-2013, 02:18 PM
goodmatt78 goodmatt78 is offline
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I would be asking the brand and type of heads, valves, pipe class and size, what type of wire, controller.........
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I have all that info. All the contractors were identical on this front as well as using copper pipe inside. The difference was # of heads on each zone. Most spec'd RB 5000 rotors, but this guy quoted my choice of 5000 or PGP.

I also asked each about methods for pulling pipe and tunneling under the sidewalk.
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  #20  
Old 04-10-2013, 07:07 PM
Bigred350 Bigred350 is offline
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Sounds good. I wasn't trying to start a argument. I've just never had a homeowner ask about pressure and what not. They just say water this area and give me a price.
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