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Old 04-26-2013, 10:28 AM
nate243 nate243 is offline
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Soil test results

Hello all. Just received my soil test results back.
I have centipede that was installed as sod approx 4yrs ago in my new home, and did great the first 2 yrs. This year has a bit of yellowing and thinning especially in the backyard which is why I sent off for a soil test initially. There were a few spots (as can be seen in the photos) in the backyard that died but are starting to fill back in with the centipede stolons. I'm not too concerned about those areas, unless someone thinks I should be, and will place new sod in those spots or just let them fill in on their own slowly.

The results recommendations:
Soil pH - 6.9
Phosphorus - 8 -VLow
Potassium - 32 - Low
Magnesium - 54 - High
Calcium - 227

Recommendations:
Nitrogen: 2lb/1000sqft
Phosphorus: 1lb/1000sqft
Potassium: 2lb/1000sqft
Apply 10lb/1000sqft gypsum as calcium fertilizer source

Results:




Front Yard:



Back Yard:





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Old 04-26-2013, 10:50 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Location: District 9 CA
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Generally speaking, looks to be nitrogen and/or iron deficient, however that is not the only problem here.
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Old 04-26-2013, 11:01 AM
nate243 nate243 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
Generally speaking, looks to be nitrogen and/or iron deficient, however that is not the only problem here.
Looking for some help, care to elaborate? To add, most yards in my neighborhood look simliar to this. Live in Florida on the panhandle, and temperatures have been so up and down this winter/fall.

My plan was to apply Lesco 15-0-15 fertilizer this spring to start, and later in the season apply a like dose with add phosphorus per the test results. In between those applications, to add the recommended gypsum also.
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Old 04-26-2013, 11:59 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Location: District 9 CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nate243 View Post
Looking for some help, care to elaborate? To add, most yards in my neighborhood look simliar to this. Live in Florida on the panhandle, and temperatures have been so up and down this winter/fall.
The general yellowing would suggest possible/probable nutrient deficiency, most likely nitrogen. The yellow streaking & isolated areas might suggest possible take-all root rot. More investigation is warranted here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nate243 View Post
My plan was to apply Lesco 15-0-15 fertilizer this spring to start, and later in the season apply a like dose with add phosphorus per the test results. In between those applications, to add the recommended gypsum also.
The soil test tells me very little about your site and canned lab recommendations should not be followed blindly, if at all. Further, if the soil sampling was not done properly the test results are essentially meaningless.

That said, I wouldn't concern yourself with phosphorus. Personally I would probably lean towards a custom mix of ammonium sulfate and SOP (sulfate of potash) given your pH, but without knowing soil type, environment and soil water management can't really recommend anything with certainty.
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  #5  
Old 04-26-2013, 02:14 PM
carriedrewdog carriedrewdog is offline
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Location: Jacksonville, Fl
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Your 15-0-15 is missing something in the middle. A 10-10-10 fertilizer mix should be easy to find but probably will not have minors in it. I'd put down the 10-10-10 and an application of Ironite for the minors.
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  #6  
Old 04-27-2013, 09:55 AM
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doug1980 doug1980 is offline
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Location: Crestview FL
Posts: 255
Soil test results

Your soil test results are very common for around here. The problem with turf yellowing is it could be several things and depending on what it is if you misdiagnose you could damage it worse. One reason for the yellowing could be Nitrogen deficiency, however if you add more Nitrogen but that wasn't the problem then your centipede could go into decline. Centipede needs 1-2 lbs of N per year no more than 2 lbs. Overwatering or under watering may be the cause more commonly overwatering which leads to a fungus or root rot.
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