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Old 07-04-2013, 09:21 PM
bbillymac bbillymac is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: indianapolis in.
Posts: 5
Indiana Commercial Pesticide Applicator License training . . .

Ok, here is the information. I'm posting this because this is the info I was looking for before I started this process. I hope I can help some folks. First, you Must have a license to apply ANY chemical on ANY lawn for money. Period. Now, are tons of guys doing it without one? Of course. But, the OISC (Office of Indiana State Chemist) has 6 people assigned to the state, a large part of whose job it is is to check on companies doing this. You will be fined if you are caught doing it without a license. Chances of being caught? Certainly slim, but those are the facts.

To get your license you must pass 2 tests. 'Core' and 'Category 3b'. The core test is easy. Many of you would be able to pass it with one reading of the book, although I would recommend more study than this. (I bought my books (both about 80 pgs.) through Purdue for $70). After I studied on my own I drove up to the Purdue campus in W. Lafayette and took both tests at the same time for free. (At remote sites it's about $100 per test.) Pretty grueling . . . 150 questions all told. The 3b test is considerably more difficult than core, but not that hard. You just have to know the book well. No tricky questions. And 16 or 17 calibration (math) questions. You Must study for this exam. If you know the material cold, it will be an easy exam. If not, well, not so much. Now, you only have to get 70% them both, so the bar is not that high.

You also have to fulfill the experience requirement. Either pass the core test and work for a licensed applicator for 90 days between June and October (something like that) or pass both and attend a 2 day seminar at Purdue. I will do this this October. It costs $200.

So after you have done all this you are certified, but NOT licensed. To be licensed you must be a business owner, apply for a business applicator license, and THEN apply for an individual applicator license. If you are working for a business, the business must have a license, then the business will apply for a license on your behalf. If you quit, you are still certified, but no longer licensed. Both business and personal license cost $45 each. So, to be licensed, you must own a business or be employed by one. Certification is good for 5 years. You can re-test or accumulate 20 continuing education units within 5 years.

Pain in the ass huh? Is it worth it? Well, if you are a pro, I think you've got to. Working on the side? I don't know. You will have to decide that for yourself. If you have any more questions, feel free to message me. I struggled a good bit getting through this, mostly from a lack of good information in one place. I hope this helps some.

Bill in Indy
Owner, Field of Dreams LLC
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  #2  
Old 07-05-2013, 10:30 PM
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foreplease foreplease is offline
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: St. Joseph, MI
Posts: 1,138
Thank you for posting this and congratulations on becoming certified. The process is siimilar in Michigan. From what I have read here, Florida folks seem to have the longest and most difficult process.

The sticky note at the top of this forum is very helpful too. That is how I found lawnsite and what convinced me to go get re-licensed after being away from turf for many years.
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Old 07-06-2013, 12:48 PM
bbillymac bbillymac is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: indianapolis in.
Posts: 5
Thanks! And welcome back foreplease!

I appreciate the reply. I've wondered about this certification/licensing process. Licensing in some form is mandated to the states at the federal level, so I do not blame our state. And now, I am not sure it is a bad thing.

Since I've been going through this process I have heard so many horror stories from folks about fertilizer/pesticide/herbicide applications gone wrong, and I'm sure many times more that simply did nothing, that I'm coming to believe it can only help our industry in the long run. Well, at least that's my current thinking.

I be interested to hear what anybody else has to say about it.

Bill in Indy
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Old 07-07-2013, 12:05 AM
nylesedwards nylesedwards is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: avon, IN
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Subscribed so I can find this and look back at it when I need it
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